Daily Archives: March 19, 2013

Rawles: Cautions for seniors seeking to re-enter workplace

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By David Rawles
Special to Inside The Pew

As the baby boomers enter into retirement and then come out again to return to work, it is quite clear there is no more work for most of them. That is what I keep hearingDavid Rawles from the boomers and older retirees who attend our job seeker workshops and seminars.

They are wrong! The message I try to convey is that many seniors are getting and holding down good jobs, responsible jobs. And I have learned over the years, even as I approach senior status, that many times age is not really the issue. But I am ahead of myself.

Many older workers need to sell to employers the things that many employers really desire in their employees. Things like mature thinking, responsible behavior, and wisdom are important traits to be flown high on one’s flag pole of accomplishments. Employers will often value an older worker’s experience in problem solving, and the consistent attendance and punctuality which demonstrates one’s ability to fulfill a commitment. Out of a mature employee’s experience they can share the wisdom that only experience can teach.

There are a few caution flags for those seniors who intend to pursue employment once again. For many smaller employers – the non-Fortune 500 employers – hiring managers are often blind to chronological age. It is not about physical age, exactly. It is about one’s ability to behave in spite of one’s physical age. It is about one’s mental age.  Demonstrating vitality, enthusiasm, energy and interest is key to getting hired.

Many older workers are rejected for jobs not because they are old, but because they act like the stereotypical older worker. If one hopes to be seen as a valuable employee, they must position themselves as one who learns like a twenty-something. Show how you are willing to take additional education, or learn new technologies, or venture into new territory.

It is also advisable for the older worker to position themselves as submissive to authority. Many older workers are viewed as know-it-alls, hard to manage, and impossible to lead. They appear arrogant to the younger leaders in an organization. It is this perceived arrogance that stands in the way of many an older candidate trying to land a good job. Telling one’s future boss you know more than they do will not likely land one the job.

David Rawles is devoting his life to helping others achieve significance. After a 31 year corporate career in HR, David founded CareerSolutions, a non-profit devoted to helping people locate, land, and succeed in their careers. He is an author, speaker and radio host. See www.careersolutionsworkshop.org.

UK graphic designer refused job because of his Christian faith

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By Peter Wooding
Europe Bureau Chief for ASSIST News Service

COLCHESTER, ENGLAND (ANS)A graphic designer is suing a hotel in Colchester, England after claiming he was turned down for a job there because he is a Christian.

Jamie Haxby

Jamie Haxby

According to an article in the Daily Mail newspaper, 24-year-old Jamie Haxby was invited for an interview with Prested Hall Hotel after applying for a job to design the venue’s advertising and promotional material.

But after discovering that he was a Christian, manager Celie Parker said that he could not be considered for the role because his beliefs would upset atheist employees.

Haxby is now taking his case for religious discrimination to the East London Employment Tribunal, and will be supported by the Christian Institute.

Spokesman Mike Judge said: “Jamie’s case is shocking, and shows that discrimination against Christians is getting more brazen.

“There’s no place for this anti-Christian intolerance at the hands of aggressive atheists. It’s high time the government took the issue more seriously.”

The Daily Mail went on to report Haxby said the interview was going well until Parker saw his portfolio which contained samples of work that he had done for his local church and a Christian charity.

She subsequently apologized for wasting Haxby’s time, and commented that both she and other employees were atheists who could not work with a committed Christian.

“Everything was going well, and I felt happy with how the interview was progressing. Parker made several comments about the high standard of my work and how talented I was,” he said.

“However, just over halfway through looking over my portfolio, Celie stopped me and said she did not think we needed to go any further. “My heart slightly sank as I could tell there was something she did not like. She then explained that she thought my work was brilliant, but that she and others on her team were atheists.

“She said that judging from my work I was clearly a committed Christian, and I understood from what she was saying that it would be very difficult for me to work there.

“I could hardly believe what I was hearing. I felt upset and angry.”

Haxby explained that his faith should not influence the hotel’s decision as to whether or not to offer him the post.

“She just said not to take it personally, but that it wouldn’t be sensible and that it wouldn’t work, or words to that effect,” he added.

“She also expressed regret over ever asking me to the interview and apologized for wasting my time. But I was feeling increasingly distressed and upset.

“I then said there was no way that this was right in equal opportunities Britain and that everyone should have an equal chance at getting a job.

The hotel has denied discriminating against Haxby on the basis of his religious beliefs, and has said that the job was given to another more experienced candidate.

“The current climate of intolerance towards Christianity has led to a number of Christian individuals being barred from different areas of public life and employment. The European Court of Human Rights recently ruled against three Christians, Lillian Ladele, Gary McFarlane and Shirley Chaplin, who were all penalized for expressing their beliefs in the workplace, said Andrea Williams, CEO of Christian Concern.

“The law needs to be re-visited urgently to ensure that it provides a basis for the full and active involvement of Christians in community life, whilst upholding the freedom of Christians to practice their beliefs in the public sphere without facing detriment.”