Monthly Archives: June 2015

Jenkins: What great leaders do in crisis

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By Dave Jenkins Jr.
Special to Inside The Pew

It is written in 2 Chronicles 32: 6-8: “He appointed military officers over the people and assembled them before himDave Jenkins in the square at the city gate and encouraged them with these words: Be strong and courageous. Do not be afraid or discouraged because of the king of Assyria and the vast army with him, for there is a greater power with us than with him. With him is only the arm of flesh, but with us is the Lord our God to help us and to fight our battles.”

And the people gained confidence from what Hezekiah the king of Judah said.

Just about anyone can lead when things are going well. The true test of leadership is how you lead during a crisis. I see three significant things that Hezekiah did that allowed his team to succeed in the face of great adversity. First, he set up accountability systems. In verse 6, he established a system that will allow people to have someone to speak to about their concerns. During a crisis situation, you need to allow people to share their mind, but not to the extent that they pollute the minds of others. These officers were probably well trained in the art of keeping peace, but they also understood the bigger picture – you serve the Kingdom and not complainers.

Two, Hezekiah gave an accurate assessment of the situation to the people. In verses 7 and 8, he does not try to sugar coat what was going on. He told them:

  • This is what it looks like: A vast army has surrounded us.

    Crisis Message On Dynamite Shows Emergency And Problems

  • This is what we have. We have a power greater than the challenge we are facing.
  • This is what we will do. We will be strong and not get discouraged because we have the power needed within us to win.

Third, he encouraged the people. The latter part of verse 8 notes, “And the people gained confidence from what Hezekiah the king of Judah said.” Leaders who address the challenges quickly, truthfully and decisively will inspire courage and action in the people they serve. If you wait to take “perfect action,” the opportunity to galvanize and mobilize your team may pass you by.

If your company, church or team is facing a crisis, share with them:

  • The leaders has to express “This is what our challenge looks like.” If you know how the problem started explain that as well.
  • This is what we have going for us that will allow us to come out of this. If you have successfully dealt with this type of problem before and succeeded, then share that.
  • The leader, along with others, must lay out a plan to overcome the challenge. That plan may be to add more focus in a particular area, or work with vendors for temporary price reductions. It may require that you make that change that you have been reluctant to implement.

Dave Jenkins is an ordained minister and leadership and relationship teacher. Jenkins, a former chaplain for the Allen (Texas) Police Department, is a graduate of Grambling State University in Grambling, La., and earned a master’s of Christian leadership from Criswell College in Dallas. He also received advanced counseling training from Amberton University. Jenkins and his wife, Phyllis, are hosts of their own weekly family relationships show, “Marriage Monday,” on KGGR 1040 at 5 p.m. CST. Follow him on Twitter at @IamDaveJenkins and “like” him on Facebook (IamDaveJenkinsJr). Learn more about his ministry at www.davejenkinsjr.com.

Calcasieu Youth Organization seeks employers for job fair; Outcry 2015 coming to several cities

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By Jacob Trimmer
Inside The Pew

In Lake Charles – Due to the recent concern of economic growth and correlated employment level in the Lakeriot conference Charles area, the Calcasieu Youth Organization (CYO) will sponsor a career job fair, from Monday, June 29 to Friday, July 3 at the Lake Charles Civic Center. The fair will run from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. and is sponsored by Sasol North America.

Karew Records recording artist Jonathan Nelson will entertain during the Revival In Our Town (R.I.O.T.) Conference on June 29. Cost is $25. Employers interested in being a part of the fair should contact Pastor Larry Miles, president of CYO, or his wife, Linda, at calcasieuyouth@yahoo.com or (337) 309-5075 to register. There are no entry fees for employers. Deadline is Friday, June 26.

In Baton Rouge – Registration is under way for Masterpiece Kids (Ephesians 2:10), a summer arts camp, sponsored by First Baptist Church of Baton Rouge, 529 Convention St. The camp is scheduled for July 6 to July 10 from 8 a.m. to noon daily. Cost is $10 per child. For kids completing kindergarten through sixth grade. Register online at First Baptist.trailer movie Brommers Kiek’n

In Irving – Interested in becoming a foster parent? The Bair Foundation Child and Family Ministries will hold an orientation on June 25 from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at its office, 4425 W. Airport Freeway in Irving. Call 972-957-0030 for more information.

Outcry Tour 2015 is coming to the following cities on these dates: Pittsburgh (July 25); Washington, D.C. (July 26);Hillsong UNITED Greensboro, N.C. (July 27), New Orleans (July 29); Nashville (July 30); Atlanta (Aug. 1); Miami (Aug. 2); St. Louis (Aug. 4); Tulsa (Aug. 5); and Houston (Aug. 6). Performers vary by location and include Hillsong UNITED (pictured right), Kari Jobe, Bethel Music, Passion, Lauren Daigle, and Trip Lee. Guest speakers include Nick Hall and Shaun Groves. For ticket information and venue locations, visit www.outrytour.com.

In Katy – The Katy Christian Women’s Connection will host monthly Prayer Connections on July 9 and August 13 from 10 to 11:30 a.m.  Join in praying for our family, friends, military, city and country.  Please call 281-232-8338 for locations.

Submit church and nonprofit events, Christian concerts, and fundraisers to Jacob Trimmer at pewnews@aol.com for publication.

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NBA MVP Curry shining light for Jesus, on and off the court

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By Michael Ashcraft and Mark Ellis
Special to ASSIST News Service

Stephen Curry, who picked the lock to Cleveland’s defense to win the NBA championship, likes to point people to “the Man who died for our sins onStephen Curry the cross.”

Curry was named the NBA 2015 most valuable player and led the Golden State Warriors to the championship, but he said worldly prizes don’t compare with Heavenly ones.

“I know I have a place in Heaven waiting for me because of Him, and that’s something no earthly prize or trophy could ever top,” Curry told Fellowship of Christian Athletes.

LeBron James seemed to be willing his way to the championship for the Cleveland Cavaliers, without two of his supporting stars who were injured. Curry was floundering with low points as the finals initially favored the Cavaliers 2-1.

Then Curry, 27, started dropping his trade-mark, high-arched three-pointers. When double-teamed, he would make miraculous passes. And for the rest of the finals, the Cavaliers played a futile game of catch-up as the Warriors won each of the next three games to clinch the championship.

Curry was 13 when he accepted Jesus as his Savior. “It was a big decision that my parents couldn’t make for me,” he said. “It’s been a great walk since then. He means everything to me.”

With Christian humility at the MVP ceremony, Curry showed up void of all the mad-dogging swagger of other superstar ballers. He credited his wife for being his “backbone” and his parents for teaching him that studying and washing the dishes were more important than basketball.

“First and foremost, I have to thank my Lord and Savior Jesus Christ for blessing me with the talents to play this game,” said the 6’3”, 190-pound point guard. “I’m His humble servant right now, and I can’t say enough how important my faith is to who I am and how I play the game.”

Steph – as he’s called by his teammates – was raised in Charlotte, NC, the son of a 16-year NBA veteran. He had a brother and a sister. His mom was something of a Christian disciplinarian, keeping the sports-obsessed boys on track with firmly established priorities.

“How we did in school growing up was important,” he said. “If we didn’t handle that business, there were no privileges. I remember sitting out my first middle school game because I didn’t handle my stuff at home. That was a pretty embarrassing moment if you go to your first middle school game and you have to tell your fellows, ‘Hey, I can’t play tonight. I didn’t do the dishes at home.’ That lesson taught me there’s more to life than basketball.”

His rise to prominence was unlikely. He was told he was too short, too lightweight, not physical enough. His high school had only moderate interest in his play. But Curry ignored the criticism and focused on what he could do. He developed an exquisite sharp-shooting touch that eventually silenced critics and left opponents shaking their heads.Watch movie online The Transporter Refueled (2015)

His Under Armour gear is trade-marked “4:13” from Philippians 4:13: “I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.”Curry 4:13 shoes

At Davidson College in North Carolina, he led the Wildcats on consecutive NCAA title runs. After his junior year, the Warriors drafted him in 2009.

In the summer of 2013, Curry joined a mission trip to Tanzania. He donated 816 mosquito nets to African refugees to fight against malaria. He calculated the unusual number of nets by multiplying by three the number of three-pointers he had scored the previous season.

Not only does Curry lead his team on the court, he leads them off the court with his Christian example. Most of the players are Christians. They attend chapel before every game. Their devotion to Christ is so note-worthy that the San Jose Mercury News called them “choirboys.”

“The Holy Spirit is moving through our locker room,” he told Breaking Christian News. “It’s allowing us to reach a lot of people, and personally I am just trying to use this stage to share how God has been a blessing in my life and how He can be the same in everyone else’s.”

The ever-cool, baby-faced three-point-maker keeps improving, looking to extend his basketball legacy and all the while shine his light for Jesus.

“Basketball has always had a special place in my heart,” Curry said. “And being saved is a great feeling. There are so many things we have to overcome in this life. Jesus, through his work on the cross, has paid the ultimate price for us. I’m proud to be a child of God.”

Individual Curry photo courtesy of The Associated Press; “4:13” shoes from Godreports.com.

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Nixon: When brethren fall

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By Brian Nixon
Special to ASSIST News Service

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. – It doesn’t take a genius to recognize that the persecution of Christians is at an all-time high around the world. According to Open Doors, the ministry started by Dutchman, Brother Andrew, the persecution of Christians has reached “historic levels.” Yet when one thinks of persecution, we normally don’t think of the United States of America. Rather, our minds wander to the Middle East or Africa. After all, one asks, wasn’t America founded upon a Judeo-Christian worldview? The answer of course is, yes, the European influence upon America was founded upon a Christian ethic.

But as the recent news of the massacre on the night of June 17 at Emanuel AME Church shows (where nine innocent people were killed), America – black, white, Middle Eastern, Asian, or Native American — is not immune to persecution. This particular hate crime focused on African Americans, making it that much more heinous. But it must be noted that they were African American Christians, people who were studying the Bible and praying; they were seeking Christ and His kingdom.

How our hearts should ache.

As the various media outlets look for answers to the crime (as they should), we Christians need to provide a different kind of answer: those from God’s word and witness – the testimony of His people working in love.

In a tragedy like this, there is no room race politics or parading. Rather, our response as Christians should be one of prayer and provision for our fallen brethren and their families.

When one part of the Body of Christ suffers, we all suffer; when several of His children are hurt, we all are hurt. Why? We stand as a body of One (Ephesians 4:5-6).

Remember to pray for the Emanuel AME Church and the families affected by this horrific crime of persecution, one filled with hate for people of color. But let this tragedy be an opportunity to demonstrate our love for one another (John 13:35); let the heartbreak of this event turn our hearts toward our brethren around the world facing similar tortuous acts, showing them the love of Christ, and showering them with the prayers of His people.

Photo caption: Worshipers embrace following a group prayer across the street from the scene of a shooting at Brian_NixonEmanuel AME Church, Wednesday, June 17, 2015, in Charleston, S.C. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

Brian Nixon is a writer, musician, and minister. He’s a graduate of California State University, Stanislaus (BA) and is a Fellow at Oxford Graduate School (D.Phil.). As a published author, editor, radio host, recording artist, and visual artist, Brian spends his free time with his three children and wife, painting, writing music, reading, and visiting art museums.

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Suspect in shooting at Charleston AME church apprehended

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By Grelan Muse Sr.
Inside The Pew

The gunman in a deadly shooting rampage at a historically black church in Charleston, S.C., has been captured by the police.

Dylann Storm Roof, 21, was arrested during a traffic stop in Shelby, N.C., as reported by Reuters, 14 hours after Roof walked into Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church at opened fire on the congregants during the prayer meeting on June 17. Greg Mullen, Charleston Police Chief, said Roof is cooperating with authorities. The FBI is investigating the church shooting as a hate crime.

The Associated Press reports Roof attended the meeting and stayed approximately an hour before the shooting, said Greg Mullen, Charleston Police Chief.

Of the dead is the church’s pastor, state Sen. Clementa Pinckney, 41, D-Columbia. The married father of two wasrevpinckney elected to his seat at 23. Mullen said the names of the victims will be released once their families have been notified.

Charleston Mayor Joseph P. Riley told The Associated Press the shooting is an “unspeakable and heartbreaking tragedy.”watch Noctiflora film now

“Of all the cities, in Charleston, to have a horrible hateful person go into the church and kill people there to pray and worship with each other is something that is beyond any comprehension and is not explained. We are going to put our arms around that church and that church family.”

Immediately following the shooting, pastors and citizens held a prayer vigil outside Emanuel AME. Morris Brown AME Church in Charleston hosted a community prayer service in remembrance on June 18.

The Emanuel AME church traces its roots back to 1816, when several congregations split from Charleston’s Methodist Episcopal Church. Historical records show one of the church’s founders, Denmark Vesey, tried to organize a slave revolt in 1822. Vesey was caught and white landowners burned his church in revenge. Its congregants also played a part in the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s. In the wee hours of June 17, The King Center tweeted an undated photo of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. worshiping at the historic church.

Photo caption: Surreace Cox, center, of North Charleston, S.C., holds a sign during a prayer vigil down the street from Emanuel AME Church during the morning of June 18. (The Associated Press)

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