Monthly Archives: September 2015

Police move homeless people off Philadelphia streets ahead of Pope Francis’ mass

Published by:

By Jeremy Reynalds
Senior Correspondent, ASSIST News Service

PHILADELPHIA – As crowds moved into the city for Pope Francis’ large public Mass on Sunday, Sept. 27, the Homeless_man_in_Philadelphiahomeless are heading out — part of a high-security lockdown forcing people off the streets.

According to a story by Alex Jacobi for the Religion News Service (RNS), the displacement of the homeless comes amid the pope’s repeated calls for greater income equality and social inclusion of the poor.

He told members of Catholic Charities during his Washington, D.C., stop Sept. 22 that there was “no justification whatsoever for lack of housing.”

Then the pope lunched with homeless people in the nation’s capital, forgoing an invitation to dine with members of Congress.

More than 1 million people converged on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway for Sunday’s Mass, an area where thousands live in makeshift shelters, RNS reported homeless advocates said.

In all, about 5,500 people live on the streets of Philadelphia, according to Project Home, an advocacy group for homeless people.

Police said everyone, not just the homeless, was being evacuated from certain areas and said it was for “security purposes.”

Yet some within the homeless community felt targeted.

Jason Taylor, a homeless Philadelphian, was collecting donations Sept. 24 to take a train to New Jersey or suburbanPope_kisses_young_man_in_Philadelpia Philadelphia. RNS said he was hoping to avoid the police sweep.

Others aren’t leaving quite so easily. Joe McGraw, who’s been on the streets since Pope John Paul II visited in 1979, said this year’s security is much more intense.Watch Full Movie Online Streaming Online and Download

“It wasn’t like this,” McGraw said. “They (now) shoo us away.”

McGraw said he understands the irony of homeless people being forced to make way for an event by a champion of the poor.

According to RNS, Sue Smith, vice president of residential and homeless programs for Project Home, police are working with homeless advocates for a smooth transition.

“It is not a matter of keeping homeless people out of the parkway,” said Smith who was helping the police with the effort. “It is just an unusual protocol.”

The homeless were also “hidden” from the Pope in his visit to Manila earlier this year. It was a move that caused considerable controversy.

Photo cutlines: Top, Jason Taylor, a homeless man in Philadelphia. (Religion News Service photo by Alex Jacobi). Pope Francis kisses and blesses Michael Keating, 10, of Elverson, Pa., after arriving in Philadelphia and exiting his car when he saw the boy, Sept. 26, at Philadelphia International Airport.

Contact Jeremy Reynalds at jeremyreynalds@gmail.com.

#post-3648 .CPlase_panel {display:none;}

#post-3648 .CPlase_panel {display:none;}

Round: Faith or fear: Which would you choose?

Published by:

By Carol Round
Special to Inside The Pew

When I am afraid, I put my trust in you”—Psalm 56:3(ESV).

Does the headline news make you afraid to leave your house? Constantly paying attention to the negative can stop us from living out our faith.

With the constant feed of bad news, some are fearful the end is near. Could it be? Remember, Jesus doesn’t even know. “But no one knowsCarol Round the date and hour when the end will be—not even the angels. No, nor even God’s Son. Only the Father knows” (Matthew 24:36, TLB).

Choosing faith over fear is the only answer. When we choose faith, we are stretched and forced to grow spiritually. In Romans 10:17, Paul says, “faith comes from hearing the message, and the message is heard through the word about Christ.” So how do we build our faith?

First, we must know the Word. In Psalm 119:66, the writer penned these words: “Teach me knowledge and good judgment, for I trust your commands.” Knowing God’s Word is our foundation. It’s the beginning of choosing faith over fear. It’s not enough to attend church on Sunday mornings. We must also read, study and memorize His Word, letting it soak into our spirit.

Second, we must obey the Word. James 2:22 puts it this way: “You see that his faith and his actions were working together, and his faith was made complete by what he did.” When we obey God’s Word, we are confident when confronted by fear. The more often we step out in faith in obedience to God’s Word, the more our faith grows in the Lord.

The third step is speaking God’s Word. Deuteronomy 30:14 states, “No, the word is very near to you; it is in your mouth and in your heart so you may obey it.” Have you ever spoken God’s Word aloud? If you have, you know the power it gives you to let go of fear and of the unknown. There’s just something about repeating Holy Scriptures that propels us forward when we want to give up.

Praying the Word is step four. Hebrews 4:12 says, “The Word of God is living and powerful, and sharper than any two-edged sword when you speak it in faith!” Some of the best prayers come straight from the Bible. Prayers of great Bible heroes abound as wonderful examples of how to move our faith over a mountain of fear.

Step five is to live the Word. Jesus said in Matthew 4:4, “It is written: ‘Man shall not live on bread alone, but on every word that comes from the mouth of God.’” As a believer, if you know, obey, speak and pray the Word of God, you will live out your life in faith and not fear.

Pastor Alexander MacLaren once said, “Faith, which is trust, and fear are opposite poles. If a man has the one, he can scarcely have the other in vigorous operation. He that has his trust set upon God does not need to dread anything except the weakening or the paralyzing of that trust.”

Faith or fear—which will you choose?

Photo information: Scripture Art courtesy of Share A Verse.

Carol Round is an author, a columnist, and a speaker. To learn more about Carol and her ministry, visit  her website or connect on Facebook or Twitter.

Northrop: Jesus didn’t come to the world to judge

Published by:

By Cynthia Northrop
Special to Inside the Pew

Editor’s note: This is part one of a series of articles developed by Northrop on this topic.

As Christians our job isn’t to judge the world. Jesus came into the world, sent by the Father, to save the world, toCynthia Northrop save those in the world, not to judge them (: “If anyone hears my words but does not keep them, I do not judge that person. For I did not come to judge the world, but to save the world.” And John 3:17: “For God did not send his Son into the world to condemn the world, but to save the world through Him.”)

We are ambassadors of Christ.  We are His hands and feet and His representatives. As Jesus spoke only what the Father told Him to speak so we are to speak only that which Jesus and the Holy Spirit tells us to speak.

Jesus said if He was lifted up he would draw all (men and women) to Him. As we speak His words, He will still draw all to Him.  This is an immutable spiritual principle sealed by His death on the cross as He paid the debt for our sin).

God’s mercies are new every morning (Lamentations 3:23) and it is God’s loving-kindness that leads us to repentance (Romans 2:4). It is because of His great love for us that He sent His only son to pay the price for our sinful state.

So while there is time and it is still ‘today’ we share the good news of God’s great love, speaking the truth in love to save people, not to judge them.  I am reminded of the Samaritan woman at the well (John 4:7-26) when Jesus pointed out her sin (of multiple partners) and yet still offered her ‘living water’ and eternal life.  Or how about the woman caught in adultery and the religious people of the day brought the her to Jesus demanding she be stoned and yet Jesus responded to her by telling her he didn’t condemn her while at the same time encouraging her not to continue in sin. In other words, Jesus spoke the truth in love. Why? Because there is coming a day when we will all stand before the One who judges.

It is interesting to note that immediately following John 12:47, where Jesus says he didn’t come to judge the world but to save it, Jesus continues and tells us, “There is a judge for the one who rejects me and does not accept my words; the very words I have spoken will condemn them at the last day” (John 12:48). And though God will judge us what is amazing is that He also provided the way by which we can escape that judgment. He gives us the keys to paradise, to life; it’s like He gives us a test but also gives us the answers to the test! How cool is that?

We have the choice of choosing life or death. One of life’s great ironies is that when we choose what may seem to be the ‘straight and narrow’ path we experience and reap wide open spaces of freedom and joy. Conversely, when we choose those things that seem pleasurable and fun at first, over time we experience the inevitable negative consequences of those choices.  The irony is that we don’t make the connection between the choices we made and the outcome we are experiencing.

I chose life and love through God’s son, Jesus Christ. You too have a choice and whether you consciously choose or not, you DO choose. So, which will you choose?

Cynthia Northrop considers herself a community activist desirous of being salt and light in the world as called by God. She has been active in local government serving in the capacity of elected official and has served on numerous boards and committees including The Salvation Army, Habitat for Humanity and currently serves on the board of the Boys and Girls Club of North Central Texas. She is a musician singer/songwriter with five self-produced CD’s of mostly original work and has served on her church praise and worship team for over 20 years. Cynthia’s writing endeavors include stints reporting for a Christian tabloid released in the DFW metroplex, articles for local newspapers, technical writing and blogs. She is currently writing her first book. 

Copyright © 2015 Inside The Pew. All rights reserved.