Category Archives: Book Reviews

Bestseller or not, we all have a story to tell

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Deuteronomy 31:8, old testament bible scriptures

By Deanna Nowadnick
Special to Inside The Pew

I never expected to write a book. Mom had asked me to write a book, but at the time my boys were little and I couldn’t get a grocery list put together. Later when the boys were in high school, Mom asked again, but I deferred, deanna nowadnick“Writers write books.” After Mom’s death, Dad reminded me that Mom had wanted me to write a book. With no more excuses and time to reflect, I wrote a book. Then I wrote a second book.

When I wrote Fruit of My Spirit, I’d just wanted my boys to know how I met their father. My adult sons knew there was more to the story; they knew I hadn’t been studying in the library that fateful night. Before our discussion digressed into tee-hee moments, I began writing, making our family’s story part of a bigger story, a story shaped by God’s love and faithfulness, not the misplaced priorities of a young 18-year-old.

One story on love became two stories, a second one about joy. Then came one on peace. Soon a fruitful theme developed and I was exclaiming to everyone, “I wrote a book!” Then I wrote another book, Signs in Life, this time sharing driving antics, again connecting stories to a bigger, more important message of God’s love and faithfulness.

At an early book signing, a friend approached me and with a shy smile, her eye sparkling, said, “I have a story to tell…” She went on to talk about her family who emigrated from Norway, first to Canada and then to the United States. Her father died just after their arrival. With five children in tow, the youngest only a year old, her mother embraced a new life in the land of promised opportunity. Irene said her own father had been their Moses, leading them from the old country to the new. She added that her mother had been their Joshua. Then she looked away and said, “I could never write a book.”

Perhaps not. Last fall I met with a book club who’d been using Signs in Life for a devotional.  They’d just finished Maya Angelou’s memoir. At the time a reality star had just published her own memoir. I asked the group about their own stories, wondering aloud where our stories fit in. And then we talked about being part of God’s story, wondering where our own stories fit in. I walked with Moses in my second book, but I’m certainly no Moses. I’ve had struggles in life, but I’m certainly no Maya. But surrounding the cross are all our stories, stories that don’t have to be found somewhere between Genesis and Revelation to matter. They don’t have to appear on Amazon’s best-seller list to count. Our stories are more important than that, because they’re chapters in God’s great story. Richard Rohr, a Franciscan friar, said, “The genius of the biblical story is that, instead of simply giving us ‘seven habits for highly effective people,’ it gives us permission and even direction to take conscious ownership of our own story at every level, every part of life and experience. God will use all of this material, even the negative parts, to bring life and love.”

You and I may be traveling different roads, but we’re traveling with God’s divine direction, leading us where we’ve chose to go and also where we haven’t. Now that’s a story to tell!

Deanna Nowadnick is the author of two books, Fruit of My Spirit: Reframing Life in God’s Grace and Signs in Life: Finding Direction in Our Travels with God. Both are inspirational memoirs. When not writing, Deanna serves as a registered investment advisor with The Planner’s Edge, an investment advisory firm in Washington State. She’s active in her church, playing the violin Sunday mornings and serving on the leadership team. She loves Bible study and delights in meetings with various women’s groups. Deanna’s a Pacific Northwest native who’s been blessed with a wonderful marriage to Kurt. Deanna is also on Facebook at Deanna Nowadnick—Author, Speaker, Mentor and Twitter @DeannaNowadnick.

 

Meet the Author: Deanna Nowadnick

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deanna nowadnick

By Deanna Nowadnick
Special to Inside The Pew

Just for the record: I’m still getting used to the title, author. I never expected to write anything beyond an annual Deanna Nowadnick--Author PhotoChristmas letter. When I started Fruit of My Spirit, I thought I was going to be sharing a single story with my sons about how I met their father. Instead many stories emerged about how the fruit of God’s Spirit has been with me through the joyous, sad, cringe-worthy, heartwarming, forgettable, memorable moments in life. In Book 2: Sign in Life, you’ll learn about driving disasters. Again—my antics have been able to connect with Bigger (yes, capital B), more important lessons of God’s love and faithfulness.

Favorite Books Growing Up?

Nancy Drew! Carolyn Keene gave me my first “can’t put it down” experience in reading.

Favorite Author?

Anne Lamott. Bird by Bird still inspires me to write and to keep writing. I attended a writing workshop with her in May. I WAS SO EXCITED!

What advice do you have for other writers?

Write. Write. Write. And then write some more. Find someone you trust to offer advice and counsel. I’d like to thinkSIL front cover that a great story will just happen, but it takes work. It’s like exercise. Some days I’m stiff and tired. Some days I feel unstoppable. Every day I try to do a little more, a little better.

How have your reflections helped you to grow?

My two books are memoirs of stories. Looking back I was able to see that a loving, merciful God was with me at all times in every way. The reflections have given me confidence. I just don’t fret about the stumbles that may come.

What Bible verses inspire you?

Different verses speak to me at different times. My inspiration for Book 2 is from Psalm 25: “Show me your ways, O Lord, teach me your paths; guide me in your truth and teach me, for you are God my Savior, and my hope is in you all day long.” Amen.

Coffee or Tea?

Grande iced mocha first thing in the morning. I shower, brush my teeth, add a dab of mascara, and head out with wet hair to my local coffee shop.

Guilty Pleasure?

Dreyer’s Slow Churned Peanut Butter Cup Ice Cream. They now make mini sizes. They’re the perfect evening treat.

Guilty Pleasure #2?

Downton Abbey. Beautiful people in beautiful clothes, upstairs/downstairs intrigue, English accents in the English countryside. What could be better?

Guilty Pleasure #3?

People Magazine. I was only slightly embarrassed when I won the prize at recent bridal shower. We were given a list of celebrities and asked to name their significant other. Where are my priorities?

Hidden Talents?

I knit. I play violin. The first should not remain hidden, the second one should.

Most Annoying Habit?

I insist on telling people what to do and how to do it, whether I know or just think I know (see Book 2). Most of the time, it’s the latter. My husband has the patience of Job (who really wasn’t that patient).

Most Endearing Habit?

I tend to over tip. I was a waitress for four months after college. I will be forever grateful for the service of others. Trust me, I was not an endearing part of the restaurant’s wait staff.

Photo cutlines:

Top: Deanna Nowadnick
Center: Cover of Signs in Life: Finding Direction in Our Travels With God

Learn more about Deanna at www.deannanowadnick.com. Twitter: @deannanowadnickLinkedIn: Deanna Nowadnick, and Facebook: Deanna Nowadnick – Author/Speaker.

Former elected official pens book for citizens to boost their role in local government

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By Tonya Andris
Inside The Pew

In this election season, Americans are taking to the polls to perform the most treasured act granted in a democracy.

But, the election process is just one way for citizens to interact with government. And, according to Cynthia Northrop White, the best way for citizens to increase their knowledge of government is to get involvedCynthia Northrop and Women in Transportation at the local level.

“I truly believe if citizens are knowledgeable about how local government works and how different levels of government interact they will be more successful in finding solutions to issues important to them,” White said.

White, a former Denton County (Texas) Commissioner, recently celebrated the release of her first book, Make a Difference: Navigating the Maze of Local Government (Austin Brothers Publishing, $24.95).

Touted as a “local government for dummies” type book that takes a holistic approach by connecting the dots between the different levels of government and how they each inform the other, White points to her ultimate desire of motivating and equipping citizens to engage in their local communities.

“We don’t learn about local government in school. I’ve talked to many citizens during my time in office over the years and have found that the more information they get on how local government works the more they want to get involved because they begin to see they can make a difference,” White said.

The book covers the nuts and bolts of local government structure and includes practical information on knowing who and how to contact, how the federal government informs local government and perspective onMake A Difference by Cynthia Northrop White what make a community successful.

White, who holds a master’s degree in public administration from the University of North Texas, stresses the importance of collaborative partnerships.

“I believe synergistic communities of cohesive local government, community-minded businesses, strong and supported non-profit community and informed and engaged citizens spell success.”

Denton County Commissioner Bobbie Mitchell and former Commissioner White’s served on the Lewisville (Texas) City Council for three years in the early 1990s and Denton County Commissioners Court from 2001 to 2008.

“I was impressed by Commissioner White’s commitment to not only serving the citizens but to her passion for educating them as well,” said Commissioner Mitchell, specifically recalling White’s initiative in creating and initiating a Student Government Day for high school seniors, hosting town halls on specific topics of interest to her constituents, creation of a monthly transportation task force meeting designed specifically for residents of her precinct and the creation of the “380 Coalition.”

The book also includes a collection of columns on county issues White wrote while in office and distributed to community newspapers and through her own email distribution list.

“The release of Make a Difference: Navigating the Maze of Local Government allows me to continue my mission to provide a convenient and compact resource for citizens on how to understand, connect, and make a difference in their communities.”

The book is available at all major book retailers, including Amazon and Barnes and Noble.

Photos:

Top: Cynthia Northrop White, right, makes a presentation during a Women in Transportation meeting.

Right: Book cover: “Making A Difference: Navigating the Maze of Local Government”

Copyright © 2016 Inside The Pew. All rights reserved.

 

Book review: Authors trace history of Middle East, ISIS’ formation

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By Cynthia Northrop
Special to Inside The Pew

In light of the terrorist attacks in Paris and San Bernardino, Calif., it is more critical than ever to be informed aboutISIS Crisis the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS). Proverbs 19:2 says it this way, “Desire without knowledge is not good – how much more will hasty feet miss the way.” As news reports drift farther from reporting and closer to slanted commentary from myriad perspectives, it is helpful to include other sources to help understand and guide us as we pray.

If you want a brief, easy-to-understand primer on the Middle East then go pick up the book, The ISIS Crisis: What You Really Need to Know by Charles H. Dyer and Mark Tobey (Moody Publishers, $10.39). In a short and smart 136 page read you will gain perspective on the history, religion and politics of the Middle East players; the difference between the Sunni Muslims and Shiite Muslims, trace the history of the Ottoman and Assyrian empires and discover the genesis of Al-Qaeda and its metamorphosis to ISIS.

From that vantage point the authors seamlessly connect the dots through the economic and political motivations and clearly present the struggle for oil and water and the overall implications for end-time prophesy from a biblical perspective minus the fear-mongering hyperbole.

As American’s we tend to get caught up and consumed in the everyday rat-race of life; raising families, playing the chauffeur and fighting congested roads to get to work and school. Our technological society has gained us precious little time and the information age we live in has reduced our news to a limited perspective and controversial sound-bits.

It’s no wonder the complexities of the endless conflicts in the Middle East are beyond us save for the blip on the radar screen known at 9-11 when it came to American shores. As the authors link history and the underlying religious and political motivations they quote Saddam Hussein’s observation of the same, “Americans are foolish. They don’t understand anything in the world. They never travel. They don’t know anything outside the area.”

Thankfully, the authors have made it easy and convenient for us to get up to speed, examining how the outcome inCynthia Northrop dividing the spoils (of land) after World War I set the stage for the rise of the Mujahedeen from Afghanistan, the Taliban, Al-Qaeda in Iraq and ISIS, or as President Obama refers to ISIL which stands for the Islamic State and Iraq and Levant, which the authors explain, “The Levant is an early geographical term referring to the land between Egypt and Turkey, which today includes Syria, Lebanon, Jordan and Israel.”

Erwin Lutzer, senior pastor of The Moody Church in Chicago, concludes his remarks in the forward of the ISIS Crisis by sharing a most compelling need to read the book, “The third and most compelling reason to read this book is that all of these events are discussed against the background of the Scriptures.” Although the authors do not believe that the antichrist will arise out of the Islamic religion, we are treated to a general framework of Middle East prophecy. No surprise to us, it is clear that in the end, Jesus win! ISIS represents a crisis for us, but not for the One who will be declared King of kings and Lord of lords.”

Cynthia Northrop, of Dallas, is owner of Northrop Communication, and author of Make a Difference: Navigating the Maze of Local Government.

Copyright © 2015 Inside The Pew. All rights reserved.

Goodwin: Prophetic blood red moons

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God's Final Jubilee

By Dan K. Goodwin
Special to Inside The Pew

And I will shew wonders in heaven above, and signs in the earth beneath; blood, and fire, and vapour of smoke: The sun shall be turned Dan Goodwininto darkness, and the moon into blood, before that great and notable day of the Lord come (Acts 2:19-20)

There is a lot of interest in the blood red moons. Let me explain these lunar eclipses and clear up some of the confusion.

  • A blood red moon is a total lunar eclipse. Only a total lunar eclipse is considered a blood red moon. It is caused when the Earth gets between the sun and the moon. The moon appears “red” because of the rays of the sun going through the Earth’s atmosphere.
  • A “tetrad” is four consecutive TOTAL lunar eclipses in a row in a two-year period. There have been seven tetrads in the whole 2000 year New Testament Age where the blood red moons fell on the Jewish feasts of Passover and Tabernacles.
  • Seven times in the last 2,000 years there has been a rare occurrence of these four back-to-back full lunar blood red moons on the feasts of Passover and Tabernacles.
  • There is an eighth tetrad coming in 2014 and 2015.
  • Each of the first seven tetrads is associated with an important historical event that corresponded to Israel.God's Final Jubilee
  • Since the seven tetrads all revolved around Israel, it is very possible that the eighth will too.

Here are the dates of all eight tetrads that occur from Calvary to the end of the 21st century:

  • 162/163 A.D.
  • 795/796 A.D.
  • 842/843 A.D.
  • 860/861 A.D.
  • 1493/1494 A.D.
  • 1949/1950 A.D.: The Jews returned to Israel in May 1948 and got a seat on the United Nations in January 1949.
  • 1967/1968 A.D.: This tetrad began two months before the Six-Day War where Israel won Jerusalem.
  • 2014/2015 A.D.: This eighth tetrad is occurring now and on those same feast days. Three blood moons have already passed. The fourth is Sept. 28 on Feast of Tabernacles. There are no more of these “tetrads” on Jewish feast days for several hundred years.

So what does all this mean? In the Bible, the moon seems to be a sign for the nation of Israel. There have only been seven Blood Moon Tetrads on these feast days between Jesus Christ’s first coming and 2013. Remember, we are talking about total lunar eclipses on the feasts of Passover and Tabernacles two consecutive years in a row making them a very rare event that scientists call a tetrad. Each and every time there was some significant event which impacted the Jewish people. All seven times that it has happened in the last 2000 years something significant happened concerning the Jews. Seven times this rare occurrence fell on the first and last of the seven feasts that are in a seven month period on the Jewish calendar and yet, we have preachers around the country scoffing at it. Can you believe that?

Seven is God’s number of completion. The eighth tetrad ends this fall. Eight is the number of new beginnings. There were eight souls in the ark that started over after the flood. Something may take place concerning Israel. Some believe the rapture may occur. We cannot be sure, but I admonish you to get your heart right with the Lord and be ready. In my book, God’s Final Jubilee, I give more details about these events.

Evangelist Dan Goodwin is the author of God’s Final Jubilee. He travels extensively, speaking in prophecy meetings and Bible conferences across the nation. In addition to God’s Final Jubilee, he has authored several books and study guides. Contact him to schedule a meeting or to get information on his books.

Rossman: To the children’s literary world I go

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By David B. Rossman
Special to ASSIST News Service

Roy, WAI was born with cerebral palsy, and I often heard from the doctors that my legs would eventually give out on me so I should learn to use my mind. So, as aDavid Rossman child I took to writing poetry.

My motto became: “I have cerebral palsy, but it doesn’t have me, it just slows me down a bit.”

For years people told me that I would be good at writing books for kids. At first I didn’t believe them. I was into writing poetry and every time I thought of a storyline for any other type of writing, it would come out as poetry. So, I didn’t even try to write a kid’s book.

Then when my sons from my first marriage were born, life got in the way and I didn’t get to see them grow up. (That is another story.) Writing of any kind took a backseat for a bit.

When Anita, my daughter from my second marriage was born, my focus changed and I took notes on everything I could when it came to her. I did a rough draft called DADDY AND ME TIME. When my daughter and I went to the movies, rode in the car, tried to ride bikes, went for walks in the park, prayed…anything we did together became something to write about. (I really missed out on getting to do these things with my sons.)

Since I was born with cerebral palsy (which makes me walk like a penguin), in the draft of DADDY AND ME TIME, the characters are a daddy penguin and his little girl penguin. After a while, I was able to write with ease. The problem was getting someone to draw the illustrations for the book. I put the idea of publishing a children’s book back on the back burner. Though several friends kept reminding me that I should give it a shot.

Just before my daughter finished school and moved out, I started looking at the pets I live with. They were all adopted. First came Honey-Pup, a Cocker Spaniel; then came Blackie, a black cat and then Axel, the kitten, came to join our family. I began taking pictures of all three of my pets and the things they do.

I then began writing lines to go along with the pictures. I decided to make all the books interactive for the kids reading them. I left blank spaces in the sentences so the kids can fill in the blanks or as a question about the picture, like…can you find the ball for Honey-Pup?

I soon started looking into ways to self-publish and how to cut cost of overhead. I found www.lulu.com, a do-it-yourself website. Through this site I was able to print by order only. At first I thought the prices were a bit high, but when I thought about it and began to see what my work looked like when it was finished, I decided to give it a try.

So here are details of a few of them:

HI, MY NAME IS AXEL

In this book, I didn’t have a whole lot of pics to start with so I used free clip art along with the pictures of this 4-week-old kitten to tell her story.Axel  The Cat

HI, MY NAME IS HONEY-PUP

In this book, I focus on the Cocker Spaniel’s need to play ball all the time and the way she reacts to the two cats that live with her.

HI AGAIN, I’M AXEL AND THIS IS MEOW

Now as Axel the kitten has gotten older, her favorite playground (a fallen tree in the neighbor’s yard) has to be cut up so we can find Honey-Pup’s ball, which is lost in the neighbor’s yard.

HI, MY NAME IS BLACKIE

Blackie, though a lazy cat, deserved his own book so I took what pictures I could and used pictures that I took for the other books and put his book together.

THAT’S MY LIBRARY

In this book, which is a short book about the library I volunteer at, I took a chance on looking at the library through the eyes of a young patron as she visits theHoney Pup library with her mom twice a week. With the permission of her mom and herself, I wrote about the things she liked about the library and what keeps her and her family coming back to this small but mighty library in Roy, Washington.

For more information on David’s books, email him at davidbrian68@yahoo.com or write David B. Rossman, P.O. Box 401, Roy, WA 98580-0401.

 

 

 

Excerpt from ‘Doubting Thomas?: The Religious Life and Legacy of Thomas Jefferson’

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Editor’s note: This book excerpt is the first in a series that will focus on the religious legacy of the United States’ third president, Thomas Jefferson. “Doubting Thomas?: The Religious Life and Legacy of Thomas Jefferson” (Morgan James Publishing, Nov. 4, 2014) is co-authored by Mark A. Beliles, Ph.D. and Jerry Newcombe, D.Min.

Thomas Jefferson was a complicated man, especially when it comes to religion.

TRINITARIAN CHURCH MEMBERSHIP AND WORSHIP ALL HIS LIFE

Despite Jefferson’s late unorthodoxy, he maintained his support and attendance with orthodox Trinitarian churches (when available) his entire life. (He once describedThomas Small himself as a lifelong Episcopalian; but for two periods that type of church was unavailable to him—when he was in France (1784-1789) and after he retired back to Charlottesville (1809-1819).

The evidence in this book from his own writings and actions shows Thomas Jefferson to be much more involved in Christian activity than most people realize. Documents prove about 70 times that Jefferson worshiped or attended services, and over 400 incidents of him supporting religion or religious persons in one way or another. And it was proven that Jefferson worshiped other times, which he mentions in letters, but which simply do not show up in any documents.

Some may argue that just showing Jefferson financially supporting his local church does not mean he attended its services, but the overwhelming testimony of so many diverse observers clearly testify that he did so. For instance, Margaret B. Smith describes his eight years in Washington by saying: “Jefferson during his whole administration was a most regular attendant [at church in the Capitol].”[1] His political opponent Manasseh Cutler confirmed the same during those years—and even use the phrase “ardent zeal” in reference to Jefferson attending Christian services there. And Jefferson’s overseer at Monticello said of Jefferson’s retirement years that he never missed a chance to hear any preacher that came along. (This was even during the period before the Episcopal Church started back up in Charlottesville.) His family members and neighbors confirmed the same for his retirement years. And never once did any of his local pastors nor any other person in Williamsburg, Richmond, Philadelphia or Washington mention that Jefferson refrained from attending church or taking communion and participating in the weekly recitation of the Apostles’ Creed. On the positive side are many comments from the same, noting his attendance. In short, Thomas Jefferson was a committed, life long churchman.

Let’s review some of the other highlights of his personal pro-faith religious life:

  • He received his education at the hands of Christians, and he paid for his children and grandchildren to receive such an education. He also was a financial supporter of many Christian schools and colleges.
  • He was a member in good standing at Episcopalian Trinitarian congregations and a frequent worshiper at services organized by many other denominations that were predominantly orthodox.
  • On occasion, he even recommended a preacher to the Congressional chaplains, whose responsibility it was to fill that pulpit.
  • He was a very active giver to Christian causes. This was a pattern throughout his life, even in the last phase, which was the least orthodox of his earthly sojourn. Per capita, Jefferson probably gave more than today’s average Christian. He kept meticulous record of his expenditures, and it shows repeated donations to Christian churches and causes.
  • As a young man, Jefferson served as a vestryman (like an elder and a deacon rolled into one) for the Anglican Church. Also, around this same time, in 1777, he wrote up the charter for the Calvinistical Reformed Church in his town with an evangelical preacher, the Rev. Charles Clay—with whom he had a lifelong friendship. Jefferson was the biggest single contributor to this fledgling congregation.
  • Between 1821 and 1826 dozens of letters between Jefferson and Rev. Hatch, along with donations, show a renewed orthopraxic faith. At that last stage he was publicly a Christian member of a Trinitarian Episcopal church and he was accepted as a member by his pastor, while privately holding to Unitarian views.

Yet there was also evidence of doubts beginning with the 1788 letter, where he declined being a godparent because he did not understand the Trinity. But there was no subsequent evidence of a separation or withdrawal from Trinitarian churches. Despite the influence of Rev. Joseph Priestley and Unitarian friends, Jefferson claimed he did not turn away from the Christian faith. On April 21, 1803, to Rush he said unapologetically: “…I am a Christian…”

But after ten years more, in private—never public—he began to clearly express more unorthodoxy in his views. From about 1813 onward, Jefferson’s own words show a desire to promote a “restored” Christianity (that jettisoned the doctrine of the Trinity). In these later years there are several letters clearly identifying himself as an Episcopalian and a Christian (but in a non-creedal way). He said he could never be an atheist, and never once called himself a Deist. In his last year he called himself a Unitarian for the first time. Like many of the Restorationist believers in his area and like Unitarian Rev. Joseph Priestley, he believed the Scriptures had been corrupted over time, but his long-time pastors thought it was intellectual playfulness in the closet. Their perspective hopefully has been introduced through this book as a legitimate way of interpreting Jefferson’s personal faith.

[1] Margaret Bayard Smith, First Forty Years of Washington Society (London: T. Fisher Unwin, 1906), 13.

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Shine, Jesus, Shine: Allow children to celebrate Easter’s significance

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The Sparkle Egg by Jill Hardie

By Tonya Whitaker
Inside The Pew

The death, burial, and resurrection Jesus Christ can be a difficult concept to explain to children – especially when the world has The Sparkle Egg by Jill Hardiemade Easter into a holiday about bunnies.

Within “The Sparkle Egg” (Ideals Children’s Books, $16.99) by Jill Hardie is the beautiful story of God’s grace when we make missteps. Young Sam tells his parents a lie and his parents forgiven for his misdeed. To help the young boy understand the true meaning of forgiveness, his parents suggest he create a Sparkle Egg, write what brings him shame on slips of paper, and place the slips into this ornate egg.

On Easter morning, Sam awakes to find the slips of paper he had placed in the egg have disappeared. The moral of this story: once you ask God for forgiveness, you should not hold on to bad feelings. Allow yourself to live your life’s full potential. 1 John 1:9 reads, “But if we confess our sins, he is faithful and just and will forgive us our sings and purify your from all unrighteousness” (NIV).

Equally important is the egg is a symbol of the empty tomb found on the first Easter. Hardie shows that believers can still teacher our children the meaning of Easter, despite the incomplete truth floating around this time of the year. Children can still dye eggs, but it up to parents to add present accurate lessons for children to grasp. At the end of the book, Hardie gives children the opportunity to create their own Sparkle Egg.

Lydia, second grader from Dallas, said she “likes how Jesus tells him not to tell a lie. Sometimes you make mistakes and you can fix them. I like the story and the pictures.

She can thank illustrator Christine Kornacki for the intricate and captivating artistry.

“The Sparkle Egg” is written for children’s reading pleasure; but, the story reminds adults too of God’s perfect grace.

Aglow with love for Christ

Egglo Entertainment, based in Simi Valley, Calif., has found a way for egg hunt organizers to brighten up things, literally.Egglo Eggs

The company recently launched a product line of glow-in-the-dark Easter eggs known as Egglo Eggs. Founder Darcie Cobos said she strives to incorporate the Christian message of Easter into a family friendly glow-in-the-dark egg hunt. She also wants children of all ages to fully understand the sacrifice of Jesus and the hope of His rebirth in a fun and exciting way.

“A few years ago, I worked with my church’s children’s director on a Glow In The Dark Easter Egg Hunt. We managed to pack the house like never before, and the children were beside themselves with anticipation and excitement!” Cobos said. “I knew that I had to share this success with parents and religious educators to change the way children learn the message of Jesus through the Easter story.”

Cobos said Egglo Eggs are made of safe phosphorescent material that can be used over and over again simply by charging them in either sun or artificial light. A curriculum, known as The Egg-cellent Easter Adventure, accompanies the product too. This material consists of a beautifully illustrated book explaining the meaning behind the eggs, a DVD, and a professional audio version of the book.

“I set out to share this idea with parents and teachers after discovering that there were no other glow-in-the-dark Easter eggs available,” said Cobos. “The Egglo Eggs Egg-cellent Easter Adventure is such a tremendous program that truly comes from the Lord.”

Find out more information about Egglo Entertainment at http://EggloEggs.com/

 

Review: Bradshaw recounts the ‘Front Nine’ of her spiritual journey

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Sherry Bradshaw

By Tonya Whitaker
Inside The Pew

I have to be honest: I am not a fan of golf. However, for some odd reason, I felt the need last weekend to catch a glimpse of The "The Front Nine: Making Your Shots Count In Life" by Sherry Thrift BradshawMasters Tournament. I didn’t witness Bubba Watson win his second green jacket in three years on April 13, but I did use the brief experience to help me relate to the metaphorical backdrop of Sherry Thrift Bradshaw’s release, “The Front Nine: Making Your Shots Count In Life” (LifeBridge Books, $19.95).

I enjoy reading faith-centered literature that places the Christian walk into terms that most people don’t think about; Bradshaw’s book follows this model. Bradshaw’s background in golf was fulfilled through her children. Actually, she is a former World Champion Clogger, Miss South Carolina, and 1st runner-up in the 1985 Miss America pageant.

Bradshaw and her husband, Bill, are parents of three Division 1 golfers – sons Brewer and Thomas (at mom’s alma mater, Clemson), and daughter, Collins, at Georgia. You can safely call Bradshaw a golf mom, as she has spent countless hours on the links with her children as they perfected their golf game.

“The Front Nine” has practical advice on topics ranging from building self-confidence to learning from the “double bogeys” and mistakes of life.

“Through my kids’ participation in golf, I have learned so much about life – patience, kindness, and self-control; God is my caddy,” said the Columbia, S.C., native. “My spiritual gift is to help and encourage people.”

Although the book equates golf to one’s Christian walk, you don’t have to be a golfer to understand its meaning. “The Front Nine” is Bradshaw’s story are the lessons, experiences, and adventures she has encountered. At the end of each “tee,” (better known as chapter) Bradshaw provides notes for readers’ scorecard. Tee #2 on “Your DNA” was interesting. As a child of the Almighty, we are created in His image. Sadly, there are many people walking around today thinking they are worthless. God loves you because He made you! Bradshaw wrote, “Don’t ever let Satan convince you that you aren’t worthy; you are a child of God (John 1:12).”

“The Front Nine” is a message of hope for us. Regardless of past mistakes, the future is always brighter if we cling to Him; don’t allow the “double-bogeys” to deter your path to righteousness. The high point of the book is its brevity; I was able to complete reading it within two hours.

Through her nonprofit organization, fittingly called Back 9 Ministries, Bradshaw is now living her divine purpose by encourages others to be all He created them and to live a life of significance. She has inspired hundreds of audiences at corporate events, schools, churches, and community organizations.

Learn more about Bradshaw and Back 9 Ministries by visiting www.Back9Ministries.org.

Note: In closing, I ask everyone to keep Sherry and her family in your prayers; her mother has recently gone home.