Category Archives: From The Pulpit

Jenkins: Take advantage of those opportune times to share Gospel

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By Dave Jenkins
Special to Inside The Pew

One of my passions has always been sharing my faith. In my younger years, I was very rigid in my approach in sharing the Gospel. I left very little room for the other person to have a right toCalm Gospel their opinion. As I matured, I learned that compassion was a major component in sharing your faith. Jesus showed this in Matthew 9:36.

So on the last day of 2014 my wife and I decided to have lunch at a new place. It was recommended to us by our youngest daughter. I was not feeling all that well, battling a sinus infection, but food!!! Well, that is an automatic cure even if not permanent to make me feel better.

The restaurant had a great feel to it, formal but not stuffy. The wait staff was great. Our waiter was a young man with a very polished demeanor. He was thin in size and medium build. However, there was something more to him that I could not figure out in the beginning. During our meal, he was not as attentive to our needs as he could have been. Several times he forgot items or did not focus on the task at hand. Since it was only 11 a.m. and there were not many patrons, I could not blame his poor performance on the work load. At one point, I wanted to pull him aside and mention a couple of things but for some reason I did not. I would later find out why I did not move on that thought.

At the end of our meal my wife asked him a question about his religious belief. He hesitated for a moment and then begin to explain that he had a relationship with God but was not enamored with the church. It was at that point it became obvious to me why I hesitated to comment about his service. Had I done so I probably would have severely negatively impacted my ability to say what the Lord gave me to share with him.

The first fact I shared with him was that even Jesus went to church (called the Temple) and surrounded himself with others. I then shared with him that there areDave Jenkins Jr some inherent problems we all face when we deal with being connected with others, and just because it is a church does not mean these problems don’t show up at church. I wanted to quote Hebrews 10:25 with him but the Spirit of God said to just teach him the principles.

He acknowledged what I shared but was also concerned about the rigid and formal systems he saw in church when he was growing up. I then asked him if he grew up in a particular denomination, and he confirmed that he did come out of that denomination. However, his mother had since converted from that denomination and he called her a Christian and not by any denominational labels.

My next point I shared with him was that heaven is a place where people are deeply and strongly connected in corporate Worship – so much so that he might be uncomfortable there. He laughed and stated that his mother told him some of the same things.

It was at this point he shared with us that this was not just luck that we were there but a divine appointment. He explained that he does not work on Wednesdays. He also asked, “Did my mother send you guys here?”

He said that he is willing to re-think his position and follow his mother’s advice concerning being connected to a church.

As my wife and I left the restaurant, we felt blessed to have met our young friend. More importantly we enjoyed being able to see the hand of God at work in connecting us to him at the right time.

My prayer is that the work of the Holy Spirit today will propel him into greater places in 2015.

Dave Jenkins is an ordained minister and leadership and relationship teacher. Jenkins, a former chaplain for the Allen (Texas) Police Department, is a graduate of Grambling State University in Grambling, La., and earned a master’s of Christian leadership from Criswell College in Dallas. He also received advanced counseling training from Amberton University. Jenkins and his wife, Phyllis, are hosts of their own weekly family relationships show, “Marriage Monday,” on KGGR 1040 at 5 p.m. CST. Follow him on Twitter at @IamDaveJenkins and “like” him on Facebook (IamDaveJenkinsJr). Learn more about his ministry at www.davejenkinsjr.com.

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Renaldo Davis: To be loved and lead by a true shepherd

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Renaldo Davis

By Anita Jarrell-Robertson
Special to Inside The Pew

Thom Rainer, president and CEO of LifeWay Christian Resources, recently conducted a study of a few hundred laypersons over a span of 60-Renaldo Davis 1plus churches to write down what they desired of a pastor. Their responses were open-ended, and there was no limitation on the number of items they could list. According to Rainer, the top ten characteristics of the ideal pastor include:

  1. Love of congregation. 
  2. Effective preaching. 
  3. Strong character.
  4. Good work ethic.
  5. Casts a vision.
  6. Demonstrates healthy leadership.
  7. Joyous.
  8. Does not yield to critics.
  9. Transparent.
  10. Models evangelism.

All these points relate to Minister Renaldo Davis, who serves on the Ministerial Board, Music Ministry, Youth Ministry, Men Ministry, Evangelism Ministry, and Armor Bearer Ministry at Ever-Increasing Life Ministries under the leadership of Apostle David A. Cowan and Elect Lady Linda Cowan.  He is also a well-traveled Independent Gospel Recording Artist, a dedicated husband, father, and friend.

Renaldo is very serious about ministry and believes that in order to reach unusual people you must have unusual church. Minister Davis’ ultimate dream is to see young men living strong and young women living beautiful from the inside out.  Originally from the Bahamas, Davis served at a vast array of ministries upon initially entering the United States until finally reaching what he considers to be “the best church on this side of heaven, Ever-Increasing Life Ministries located in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.”

Davis reflects, “I have a great relationship with my pastor. I consult him in every aspect of my life from my marriage, my music, to my business, and all ministry affairs. He and I talk weekly and sometimes even daily.”

Renaldo’s success as a recording artist is included amongst the areas in which his pastor leads him. He proudly exhibits a strong family life, which he believes should look the same at home and in ministry.  His perception of his pastor and his choice to emulate those positive qualities lead him to success on all sides- balanced living.

“I remember growing up hearing people say they wanted to be like Michael Jordan, well I want to be like him. To me, my dad is Elijah and I want to be his Elisha. I regard our relationship somewhat like I do my marriage. I protect it, guard it, give time to it, and keep the lines of communication wide open. Now, I must say this… I love my mom (Lady Linda Cowan). Talking to her is just like talking to Dad. Their wisdom is far beyond their years. My mom has the perfect nurturing spirit. Overall, our relationship is wonderful and amazing.”

Judging Renaldo’s sentiments about his pastor, Rainer would probably adopt his pastor, Apostle Cowan, as the poster child of an ideal pastor.  In an age where recording artists, independent or otherwise are seen by some as wild and undisciplined bigots who wear their egos on their shoulders, Renaldo is a counter example of how a balanced disciple of Christ operates and why it’s important to submit to a shepherd versus a hireling.  Renaldo’s latest music video can be found at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O0eyuR5cmRk. He can be reached via email: renaldo.m.davis@gmail.com or kingdomoverchurch@gmail.com. More from Renaldo Davis @ http://www.reverbnation.com/ministerrenaldodavis.

Anita Jarrell-Robertson, a Baton Rouge, La., native and graduate of LSUBR, became a volunteer columnist for Inside The Pew Magazine inAnita Robertson 2014 after writing an article on the Rev. Dr. Alveda King, niece of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr..  Robertson also writes for The Holy Hip Hop Ezine. See more at www.anitaworships.com/blog and follow: Facebook, Twitter, Instagram @anitaworships.

 

Rutherford: Three spiritual lessons from the Tour de France

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By Dudley Rutherford
Special to Inside The Pew

If you had told me a couple of years ago that I would one day ride 60 to 70 miles on a road bicycle for fun, I don’t think I wouldDudley Rutherford have believed you. But years of playing basketball and golf had finally caught up to me, causing major damage to the meniscus cartilage in my knee. I could hardly walk after playing in a game—that’s how bad it had gotten. Then a good friend of mine recommended that I try cycling as a way to stay in shape and maintain the competitiveness I love about sports, but with less strain on my knees. So I joined the cycling ministry at Shepherd Church, the congregation I pastor in Los Angeles, and I’ve been hooked ever since.

Now that I’m an avid cyclist, the Tour de France takes on a whole new meaning for me. I’ve always admired the strength and endurance of the athletes who compete, but now I have a deeper understanding of the passion and intensity of the sport. Of course, I would never be able to race at the speed of the professionals, but as I was writing my latest book, Walls Fall Down, about the seven-day victory God gave the Israelites over Jericho, I got to thinking about what believers can learn from the Tour de France to obtain victory in our spiritual walks.

In the Bible, the Apostle Paul actually compares the Christian life to race in 1 Corinthians 9:24-27. Here are three biblical lessons we glean from the Tour de France on how to be victorious whether we are facing a personal battle or striving to accomplish something extraordinary:

Race with purpose: Every cyclist in the Tour de France has one goal: to win (or help his team leader win) the race. These athletes do not put themselves through months of painful training for the purpose of taking a leisurely bike ride in Europe or aiming to come in 57th place. No, their mission is to be the best. Italy’s Vincenzo Nibali proved his dominance in cycling to the world on July 27  by winning the annual race. In 1 Corinthians 9:24, Paul writes, “Do you not know that in a race all the runners run, but only one gets the prize? RunVincento Nibali in such a way as to get the prize. “From the moment you decide to become a Christian—from the very second you put your faith in Jesus Christ—your race begins. And it’s not sprint; it’s a marathon. It’s a lifetime journey that takes commitment and perseverance. It ends when you die, or when Jesus returns in glory (Matthew 24:30). Until that day comes, your purpose in life as a believer is to love God and to love others (Matthew 22:36-39) and to make disciples as Jesus did (Matthew 28:19-20).

Practice self-discipline: Can you imagine the extreme physical training and the strict dietary regimen that would be required to prepare one’s body to cycle across the nearly 2300 miles of terrain for the Tour de France? How many people would be willing to sacrifice time, energy, junk food, and hobbies in order to dedicate his or her entire life to a sport?

Paul writes, “Everyone who competes in the games goes into strict training. They do it to get a crown that will not last, but we do it to get a crown that will last forever. Therefore I do not run like someone running aimlessly; I do not fight like a boxer beating the air. No, I strike a blow to my body and make it my slave so that after I have preached to others, I myself will not be disqualified for the prize” (1 Corinthians 9:25-27). The apostle ran the Christian race with purpose and was intentional about rejecting worldly, temporal vices so that he would not be disqualified from the ultimate prize of eternal life.

As I wrote my book Walls Fall Down: 7 Days Steps from the Battle of Jericho to Overcome Any Challenge, the Lance Armstrong doping scandal had erupted in the media. After convicting him of using performance-enhancing drugs, the US Anti-Doping Agency stripped Armstrong of his seven Tour de France titles and banned him from cycling. Armstrong later stated that he broke the rules because of the culture of drugs in cycling—that by using performance-enhancing drugs, he was simply operating on a “level playing field.”

In sports and in the Christian life, there are no shortcuts. We will not be victorious by impure means or by trying to fit in with the culture. We simply must follow the guidelines God has set forth in His Word, the Bible, and win the race the good old-fashioned way: with integrity, commitment, faith, and self-discipline.

Focus on the eternal rewards: Every cyclist in the Tour de France dreams of getting to wear that iconic yellow jersey—the coveted prize awarded to the champion. In many other sports, the winner receives a trophy. In the Olympics, it’s a gold medal. In the Apostle Paul’s time, it was a crown, which was just a wreath made of wild olive leaves. He writes, “They do it to get a crown that will not last, but we do it to get a crown that will last forever” (v. 25). Paul is pointing out that, in any competition, the culmination of all the hard work, sacrifice, blood, sweat, and tears produces a winner, and that winner receives something that will not last forever. However, when we run the Christian race and keep our faith in Jesus through life’s various trials, we will receive the crown of eternal life (James 1:12; Revelation 2:10). We will spend an eternity with our Father in Heaven where there will be no sorrow, pain, death, or disease (Revelation 21:4).

God has wonderful things prepared for those who love Him! The Tour de France is an incredible event showcasing some of the greatest athletes in the world. But the Christian race has far greater implications. So run your race with purpose. Don’t be distracted or led astray by the things of this world. And keep your eyes fixed on the prize: the crown of eternal life. No other prize is better. No other victory is sweeter.

Dudley Rutherford is the author of Walls Fall Down and the senior pastor of the 10,000-member Shepherd Church in Porter Ranch (Los Angeles), California. You can connect with Dudley on Twitter @pastordudley. Visit www.WallsFallDownBook.com for more information.

Johndrow: Trading good for God

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By Lee Johndrow
Special to Inside The Pew

All that glitters is not gold or so the saying goes. Actually the words came from Shakespeare in “The Merchant Of Venice,” where it Lee Johndrowsays “all that glitters is not gold.” The meaning is the not everything that is shiny is necessarily valuable,

As a child I would go to the local rivers and dig up “gold” or fool’s gold (Pyrite). Later, I had an amazing pyrite collection, along with some beautiful real gold nuggets. But the pyrite was worth little. And that is the point of the phrase. Lots of things can look like gold but it does not mean they have the same value as gold. Are they?  Hmmm…Probably not!

Yesterday I wrote an article about avoiding or moving past the point of pain. A lot of people read it. A lot less people liked it. I am okay with that. Not everyone will do what it takes to get to the next place or level.

What I am going to say next is going to be controversial to some.

Today while walking and praying, I thought something has changed. All afternoon I felt it. And then tonight I felt, the collective is about to rise up and change things. The results of our expressing His goodness just overturned something. Locally, regionally and nationally. But do not look at the “obvious” but seek out that which is underneath. Earlier this week as the storm moved in, the undersides of the leaves were upturned. Keep watching. That which is hidden is being revealed. The word overturning is in the air.

What does that mean? I am not totally sure, but I am not thinking it is as easy as I would like to believe it to be. Now Ringo Starr said, “It don’t come easy, You know it don’t come easy.” I do not totally agree with that either. There is an ease in God. I believe that and experience that. But sometimes the “world” has a current created by sin. Our job is to overturn that!

Yet I recognize not everything is easy. Back to the gold. Not everything we think to be “gold” is gold. And now I move to the hard part of what I am going to say. If something good happens it does not necessarily mean it is “God” yet I can be grateful. It may not in fact mean I am “blessed” so much as it is because it may simply be a circumstance. Many things are happening these days that are good. (Be grateful.) But not all that is good is God. Hear me please. I am okay with being thankful for good things happening. It makes life easier. But it does not necessarily mean that it is God. Anymore than an accident is necessarily the devil. It may well be…just an accident.

Too many people are believing for something big and accepting something moderate. It takes a lot to wait, to be patient. To bypass good for great.

Any one of those can be a big deal. The end of arguments, with wills and estates distributed. But the one that most unnerves me is acceptance of things that will cause one to stop the growth, give up and “call it a day. My daughter Amy always told me she would never “settle” and I am kind of glad. (A great husband and a new baby.)

I feel it is important to put this on the table. Not all that glitters is gold. It is important to know that. Many things will come down the pike. And they may gleam in the distance, but that does not necessarily make it gold. And the longer you “wait” the harder it is to be sure. “Was it God? Did I miss it?”

Be wary you do not trade “good for God”. (Or “good” for excellence.) It may be a temptation. It may be comfortable. BUT…it does not mean God is on it. So, why rely on Romans 8:28 to “bail you out”? It is the “rest of God” from whence your provision comes from. It is the peace of God that allows for you to be patient. To be joyful.

Every word will be tested. Psalm 105:18-20…They afflicted his feet with fetters, He himself was laid in irons; until the time that his word came to pass, The word of the LORD tested him. The king sent and released him, the ruler of peoples, and set him free …

Easy does not always mean ease. Comfort does not always mean comfortable. What you trade for good may be the very thing you don’t want 5 years from now.

1 Chronicles 16:11 Seek the LORD and His strength; Seek His face continually.

Lee Johndrow is a staff member at The Village Church in Swanzey, N.H. Learn more about Johndrow and his dad’s ministry at www.leejohndrow.com.

Jenkins: Don’t allow pain to distract you from your purpose

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By Dave Jenkins
Special to Inside The Pew

It is almost incredible how professional athletes can play even when they are in tremendous pain from an injury. In most New York Knicks forward Willis Reedsituations, only extreme pain or injuries can stop a professional athlete from their true purpose, which is to win a championship.

The spiritual point to this is, there are some Christians who have obvious pains in their lives and there are some who have undisclosed pain in their lives. There is the pain of a life-threatening disease such as cancer. There is the pain of a marriage that is not going well. Or there is the pain of a business that is failing. There are the more secret pains such as depression, an unreported rape, a child that is rebellious, or the poor grade in a class.

Our challenge then is will we allow the pain, no matter what type it is, to distract us from our God-given purpose? Will we give in to the injury of failure or poor self-esteem or will we move forward in faith? If we don’t give into the pain, we may have an iconic moment such as Willis Reed had in game 7 of the 1970 NBA Finals on May 8. Reed played in the NBA championship game for the New York Knicks despite a severe leg injury. He went on to win most valuable player in 1970.

So the question is how was the future Hall of Famer able to move past his pain and stay focused on his purpose? What are the leadership lessons that we can learn from Reed about not allowing our pain to distract you from your purpose.

Leadership Principle 1: He thought more of the team did he did of himself.

When pain hits us it does not impact us only, but it also impacts those around us. We may have been the direct target of the pain that has been inflected on us, but our family and co-workers, church members are targeted as “collateral damage.”

But how could he play basketball when he could barely walk? He could run the risk of damaging his leg and prematurely ending his career by playing. Reed had to make the choice between following his pain or focusing on his purpose. His decision was to focus on his purpose, which was to help his team win.

We have a choice, let the pain tell us to run and hide or we can face the situation and help not only ourselves but our team (family, co-workers, business partner). Fathers, mothers, pastors and teachers; there are people whose lives are impacted by how we deal with our personal pain.  Philippians 2:4 says, “Let each of you look not only to his own interests, but also to the interests of others.”

Leadership Principle 2: He had prepared for this moment and did not want to let it get past him.

“I wanted to play,” Reed said in 2010 of his decision. “That was for the championship, the one great moment you play for all your life. I didn’t want to have to look at myself in the mirror 20 years later and say I wished I had tried to play.”

In Esther 4:14, Mordecai, the adviser/uncle to Esther reminds her that she was the possible solution to the pain that the Jewish nation was suffering. Her accent to the position of queen at the time was not a matter of chance, but God’s timing for her. Mordecai said. “Who knows if perhaps you were made queen for just such a time as this?”

You were made a leader for such a time as this. You were married for such a time as this. You were made strong by God for such a time as this. You were pushed from your comfort zone by the pain to move you to a greater call.

Leadership Principle 3: He did not give up hope.

Reed had to miss game 6 of the championship series because of his leg pain. His team lost game 6 during his absence. It would have been easy for him to give up and say, “We lost game 6, and I am not sure if I can play in game 7.” Instead, he kept searching for a way to play; he kept hope alive that he would be there for the final and deciding game.  Many times the pain that we go through is simply the transportation to get us to our destination. In Isaiah 40:31, “Those who hope in the Lord will renew their strength. They will soar on wings like eagles; They will run and not grow weary, They will walk and not be faint” (NIV).

Leadership Principle 4: He knew the importance of showing the opposing team he had no fear. 

Because of his leg injury, no one knew for sure if Reed would play in the game. The rest of his team had gone out to warm up whileDave Jenkins Jr. Reed remained in the locker room. Just moments before the game started, Reed left the locker room and headed to the basketball court. When his team and fans saw his unexpected entrance, everyone went wild with excitement; that is everyone with the exception of the opposing team, the Lakers. When Reed came to the court, the entire Lakers team stopped what they were doing and watched in unbelief as Reed went to the table to check-in for the game.

The Lakers may have thought that Reed would not show up for this game given the pain he was in. There are people who doubt you and the enemy who hates you that needs to know you have no fear of dealing with the pain. The haters need to know that you will not allow the pain or the fear of pain keep you for your purpose. 2 Timothy 1:7 says, “For God hath not given us the spirit of fear; but of power, and of love, and of a sound mind.” When the other team sees that you have no fear, it will put fear in their hearts.

Leadership Principle 5: He remembered previous times that he had to overcome obstacles to get the victory.

Too often when things don’t go well or when we encounter pain, some believers want to give up. Reed knew that pain was a part of the game. We have to remember that pain is a part of life just as it is a part of sports.

Overcomers deal with the pain and the setbacks that this world gives them because they stand on the promise of Jesus. We don’t give up on the hope that is within us.

However, we have a word of encouragement from Jesus in John 16:33 “These things I have spoken unto you, that in me ye might have peace. In the world ye shall have tribulation: but be of good cheer; I have overcome the world.”

Dave Jenkins is an ordained minister and leadership and relationship teacher. Jenkins, a former chaplain for the Allen (Texas) Police Department, is a graduate of Grambling State University in Grambling, La., and earned a master’s of Christian leadership from Criswell College in Dallas. He also received advanced counseling training from Amberton University. Jenkins and his wife, Phyllis, are hosts of their own weekly family relationships show, “Marriage Monday,” on KGGR 1040 at 5 p.m. CST. Follow him on Twitter at @IamDaveJenkins and “like” him on Facebook (IamDaveJenkinsJr). Learn more about his ministry at www.davejenkinsjr.com.

 

Texas governor rebaptized in creek where Sam Houston was immersed

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Rick Perry and his wife, Anita (AP Photo/Star-Telegram, Joyce Marshall)

By Melissa Nordell and Mark Ellis
ASSIST News Service

Surrounded by a small group of family and friends, Gov. Rick Perry was publicly re-baptized in Little Rocky Creek near Rick Perry and his wife, Anita (AP Photo/Star-Telegram, Joyce Marshall)Independence, Texas, the same place Sam Houston, the first president of the Republic of Texas, was also immersed.

The prolonged Texas drought left the creek choked with algae, so the local volunteer fire department had to clear a decent place for the governor’s baptism, according to The Texas Tribune.

Mac Richard, pastor of Lake Hills Church in Austin, conducted the baptism in March, the governor’s office reported.

Perry visited nearby Independence Baptist Church after the baptism, played the organ and soaked up the colorful local history. Since 1839, Little Rocky Creek has served as the natural baptistery for the church, which is the oldest continuously operating Baptist church in Texas, according to The Tribune.

Perry hunkered down at the circa-1874 pump organ and belted out a soulful gospel hymn. “It’s not easy to play a pump organ. You’ve got to move your feet while you play,” Phil Hassell, pastor of Independence Baptist Church, told The Tribune. “I thought he played well.”

Hassell showed the governor around the tiny historic church where he was able to see the actual pew where Sam Houston had carved his initials and those of his wife nearly 158 years ago.

“Gov. Perry has a deep and abiding faith in God. Like many people of faith, the governor wished to reaffirm his commitment in a way that holds great personal meaning,” said Felix Browne, a spokesperson for the governor.

Former Perry aide and speechwriter Eric Bearse said he wasn’t surprised that Perry renewed his faith in a private, intimate ceremony. “Baptism is a very personal expression of faith,” Bearse told The Tribune. “He has a deep and abiding faith, and it influences his view of the world and how he lives his life.”

When Sam Houston emerged from having his ‘sins washed away” at the same creek in 1854, he was said to proclaim, “I pity the fish downstream.”

Houston served as governor of Tennessee in the late 1820s and then became the first elected president of the Republic of Texas in 1836, after helping lead settlers to victory in their war of independence from Mexico. Houston was christened in the Catholic Church, a necessity in order to own land when it was Mexican territory.

Later, his wife, Margaret Lea Houston, prayed for him to become a Baptist and God granted her wish after 14 years of persistent prayer. When Texas became a State, Houston represented it in the U.S. Senate and later became its governor.

Jenkins: Clippers owner’s comments are more than just racist

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Donald Sterling

By Dave Jenkins
Special to Inside The Pew

When you look at the comments that Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling made concerning his team and minorities, IDonald Sterling think that you have to look at them as more than a racist comment.

Mr. Sterling in one voice recording managed to insult, demean, and marginalize three groups of people.

One group of people he disrespected where the players on the team. Not just the ones that are currently on the team, but any future players, Black or non-Black. When Mr. Sterling states that he gives them food and money for cars, he is negating the fact that these players were not given anything, but earn it on the basketball court. They earned it from the long hours of practice and sacrifice to develop themselves into top level athletes who can easily do what most of us, including Mr. Sterling, can only dream that we can do.  Maybe we should look at how much money the U.S. government gave Mr. Sterling in the form of tax abatements and write-offs that allow him to have a net worth of over $10 billion. The Bible says that a man’s gift will make room for him. These athletes have worked hard so that their gifts can get them into the NBA and earn commercial endorsements.

The other group of people Mr. Sterling impacted was NBA fans everywhere and Los Angeles Clippers fans in particular. For Clippers fans, the experience of a playoff run was overs-shadowed and tainted by the words of Mr. Sterling. This year, the ClippersDavid Jenkins Jr. have a legitimate shot at going deep into the playoffs. However, Mr. Sterling comments have removed the spotlight from the hardwood court and placed the attention in the public court of opinion. It was to the point that the opposing team, Golden State Warriors, seriously considered not playing Game 5 of the series. Can you image the aftershocks in the sporting world if the Warriors had boycotted the game? If the boycott had occurred you can truly say that the Warriors understood Proverbs 17:17: “A friend loveth at all times, and a brother is born for adversity.”

Mr. Sterling’s comments have also insulted women. I am not going to address the motives of why his girlfriend recorded the conversation, but it is evident that Mr. Sterling has control issues when it comes to women. A man has to be very insecure to want to control who a woman communicates with and at what level, even to the point of trying to determine who she can be seen with and where. Women are not objects to be controlled, but people with their own thoughts and goals. As a man, you have to be comfortable with your relationship with a woman, in order for both of you to enjoy what you have. If a man has to control every aspect of a relationship, then affection has been replaced by contractual agreement, Song of Solomon 1:16: “My beloved is mine, and I am his …”

Dave Jenkins is an ordained minister and leadership and relationship teacher. Jenkins, a former chaplain for the Allen (Texas) Police Department, is a graduate of Grambling State University in Grambling, La., and earned a master’s of Christian leadership from Criswell College in Dallas. He also received advanced counseling training from Amberton University. Jenkins and his wife, Phyllis, are hosts of their own weekly family relationships show, “Marriage Monday,” on KGGR 1040 at 5 p.m. CST. Follow him on Twitter at @IamDaveJenkins and “like” him on Facebook (IamDaveJenkinsJr). Learn more about his ministry at www.davejenkinsjr.com.

Registration under way for free youth pastor summit in Tulsa, Houston

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By Jacob Trimmer
Inside The Pew

In Tulsa, Okla., and Houston: Student Leadership University will hold its annual Youth Pastor Summit in Tulsa on April 7 andlogo in Houston on April 8. Registration is free. Visit http://www.slulead.com/ to register.

In Dallas: Paul Quinn College and the 10th District of the African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church will partner together to play host to a job fair on Wednesday, April 16 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on the campus of the college, 3837 Simpson Stuart Road. There is no cost to either employers or future employees. Contact Kelsel Thompson at kthompson@pqc.edu for more additional information.

In Baton Rouge, La.: More than 500 faith leaders from across Louisiana will descend on the state Capitol Building on April 1 for a Faith Day at the Capitol rally to demand Governor Bobby Jindal and state legislative leaders to provide leadership to secure passage of legislation that will curb the high mass incarceration rates in the state. Louisiana has the highest incarceration rate in the world. The rally is slated to run from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m.; a press conference will follow. Visit www.piconetwork.org.

In Dallas: Save April 15 at 11:30 a.m. on the calendar! Hope Mansion, a nonprofit organization in Cedar Hill that helps womenTracey Mitchell ages 18-35 who experience crisis pregnancies, has planned its Extraordinary HOPE women’s luncheon with guest speaker Tracey Mitchell (author of Downside Up). The conference to will take place at The Tower Club in Thanksgiving Tower, 1601 Elm St. in Dallas. Tickets are $30 per person; $240 for table of eight. Contact Jennifer Wulff, luncheon chair, at info@hopemansion.org.

In Shreveport, La.: Centenary College of Louisiana’s World House for Environmental Sustainability, in cooperation with community partner Shreveport Green, will host Chad Pregracke, CNN Hero of the Year for 2013, Thursday, April 3. The Living Lands and Waters founder and president will deliver a convocation at 11:10 a.m. and a workshop-styled lecture at 4 p.m. in Kilpatrick Auditorium. Both events are free and open to the public. Visit www.centenary.edu.

In Katy, Texas: The Katy Christian Women’s Connection will hold a fashion show luncheon on Thursday, April 17 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at The Golf Club at Cinco Ranch, 23030 Cinco Ranch Blvd. Cost is $18 per person. Take a sneak peek at the latest fashions from La Centerra’s. The guest speaker is Oklahoma native Deborah Cerkovnik. Deadline for reservations is noon on Monday, April 14. Email katyCWC@gmail.com for more information.

Christian nonprofit and events roundups are run weekly. To get your event listed, contact Jacob Trimmer at pewnews@aol.com.

American youth give Pope Francis unique anniversary gift

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Catholic Extension

Special to Inside The Pew

To celebrate the March 13 anniversary of Pope Francis’ election, the youth of America, with the help of Catholic Extension, areCatholic Extension giving him a unique gift: a close-up look at their efforts to extend beyond themselves and “make some noise.”

After the pope challenged youth to “make some noise” at World Youth Day in July, Catholic Extension asked young people to answer his call by dedicating a day to prayer, service or philanthropy – an “Extension Day.” They then encouraged young people to document their Extension Day on video.

More than 70 videos were received involving thousands of youth from 47 dioceses across the U.S. Top videos were determined by social media support and a panel of judges, including Father Dave Dwyer, director of Busted Halo; Rev. Father Mark Mary, co-host of EWTN-TV’s popular Life on the Rock program; and actor Chris O’Donnell.

This week Cardinal Francis George, chancellor of Catholic Extension, is presenting a selection of the videos in a special report to Pope Francis. Finalists will be chosen and announced later this month. In addition to the chance to have their videos viewed by Pope Francis, recipients will be eligible for grants to benefit their ministry. Based on the response, Catholic Extension hopes to make Extension Day an annual event.

“We were overwhelmed not only by the number of youth participating in Extension Day, but also by the compassion and creativity of their good works,” said Joe Boland, vice president of mission at Catholic Extension. “Young Catholics in America are extending the love of Christ in so many ways, and we believe that sharing this with Pope Francis will be a meaningful gift to him.”

Catholic Extension, which is a national organization that supports people, ministries and churches across America, has a special relationship with young Catholics, providing more than $3 million annually in support of programs that engage youth and nurture future Church leaders. To watch Extension Day videos and learn more about Catholic Extension, visit http://www.extensionday.org.

 

Will Graham: Grandfather, Billy Graham, ‘is not doing well’

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By Dan Wooding
Founder of ASSIST Ministries

BELLFLOWER, Calif. (ANS)Evangelist Will Graham, the grandson of Billy Graham, has said that at the age of 95, Mr. Graham is close towill-franklin-billy-graham going home to be with the Lord.

In an exclusive interview at Hosanna Christian Fellowship, Bellflower, Calif., before he was to preach Dec. 11 at a special Christian event, he spoke movingly about Billy Graham’s frail condition.

“I saw my grandfather last week and he is not doing well,” said Will, the son of Franklin Graham. “He’s not suffering or anything. It’s just that old age has caught up to him and is sucking the life out of him.

“On Nov. 7 [with his My Hope America with Billy Graham* outreach], he finished his race and up until that time, God had protected his health and gave him supernatural strength and now, the only thing left is for him to come home. God has removed his hand of protection and old age has set in.

“He has been in a wheelchair for a long time. He can walk, but he is in the wheelchair because it is easier for us to move him and it safer for him.”

When I asked him what happened during his last meeting with his much-loved grandfather at his Montreat, N.C., home, he revealed that they didn’t talk very much.

“That’s the best thing of being a grandson,” said Will. “We don’t have to say much. We just sit there, look at each other and hold hands. His neck was sore as he had been in bed a whole bunch, so I rubbed his neck.”

He said they say a few words to each other, adding, “It was sort or grandfather-grandson, talk, more than anything.”

What would he like people to know about Billy Graham, the world’s most well-known evangelist, with whom I have had the privilege of working with on several occasions in Russia, Germany and Puerto Rico?

He replied, “My grandfather is the most humble man I have met. Some people often say, ‘How come Billy Graham never got caught up in money or with woman, like so many others?’ That was because God was protecting him from all that stuff because of his humility. The Bible says that ‘God gives grace to the humble,’ so because my grandfather was humble, God protected supernaturally from all that stuff and gave him grace. It was not because of anything that Billy Graham had done, but because of his humility before the Lord.

“To me he is one of the most humble men I have met. I just wish I had his humility all the time.”

I concluded the interview by asking Will Graham how people could pray for his grandfather, and he replied, “I don’t know how to answer that anymore. I wish He would give him strength, but I don’t think he needs strength anymore. It’s time to go home.”

Will Graham, the third generation of evangelists in the Graham family, later spoke at this special Christmas event at Hosanna Christian Fellowship (http://www.hosannachapel.org) and was joined by his old friend, Dennis Agajanian. Will had stepped in for Pastor Chuck Smith, who had been invited to speak by senior pastor, Garry Ansdell, but when “Pastor Chuck” passed away on October 3, 2013, Will agreed to take his place.

*My Hope America with Billy Graham was a nationwide effort to reach people across the United States with the Gospel of Jesus Christ. Following a simple biblical model, it combined the impact of video programs (http://myhopewithbillygraham.org/programs/?) with the power of personal relationships. It was possibly the largest media event Billy Graham has ever been involved in.