Category Archives: Pew Talk

Round: And He will be called Immanuel

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By Carol Round
ASSIST News Service

CLAREMORE, OK (ANS) — “Therefore the Lord himself will give you a sign: The virgin will conceive and give birth to a son, andCarol Round will call him Immanuel“-Isaiah 7:14 (NIV).

When I was a child, I loved to read. Without being aware of it, I often curled my toes under in anticipation of what would happen on the next page before I turned it. Mysteries were my favorite.

Today, my favorite book is the Bible. Its pages are filled with mysteries, never to be solved by the limited capacity of the human brain. However, it doesn’t matter if you’re a Christ follower who anticipates what God will do next.

Wrapping our minds around a virgin birth requires us to lay our disbelief at the entrance to the stable. To believe God would come to earth in the form of a tiny baby to save the world requires us to suspend our own understanding and to trust in the One who created everything.

In the days leading up to His birthday, I love rereading the events preceding Jesus’ birth. In Luke 1:41, the author tells us, “When Elizabeth heard Mary’s greeting, the baby leaped in her womb, and Elizabeth was filled with the Holy Spirit.” Just like the baby in Elizabeth’s womb, an unsurpassed joy fills my being in anticipation of this Holy Mystery. However, just as Mary anticipated the birth of this special child, we are required to wait patiently for His return one day.

Children have a difficult time being patient when brightly wrapped packages under the Christmas tree lure them to shake the contents. My grandchildren are no exception. They can’t see the gift tightly wrapped underneath the tree, but they hope it’s something on their wish list.

Mary no doubt had a wish list. As most mothers, she had plans for her baby to be born among family, where he would be welcomed with gifts of warm clothes and other necessities. And what about Joseph? I’m sure, as the family’s provider, he would have wanted only the best for this holy child. But that wasn’t God’s plan. God often surprises us, as He did this couple-with a stable, a manger and swaddling clothes. It’s not what they anticipated but it was enough.

Many are disappointed when they open their Christmas gifts because it’s not enough. But imagine Mary and Joseph’s delight when God gave them more. After hearing the angel of the Lord proclaim the Good News, the shepherds hurried to Bethlehem to find the Christ child. After seeing him lying in the manger, they left to spread the Good News. In Luke 2:19, we are told, “But Mary treasured up all these things and pondered them in her heart.”

While we celebrate this beautiful season, let us ponder the treasure of a baby sent from Heaven for each one of us. His birth, still a mystery, should fill our hearts with joy. No other gift we have received or will receive can compare to this. “For God so loved the world that He sent His only Son that we might have eternal life.”

Carol Round is a syndicated columnist, author and speaker. She has been writing her weekly column, A Matter of Faith, after retiring from a 30-year teaching career in 2005. Her five books include three collections of her columns: A Matter of Faith, Faith Matters and by FAITH alone. In 2012, Westbow Press released her book, “Journaling with Jesus: How to Draw Closer to God” with the companion workbook, “The 40-Day Challenge.” All of Carol’s books are available through Amazon.com or by contacting the author through www.carolaround.com.

Marschall: How can they believe?

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By Rick Marschall
Special to ASSIST News Service

SWARTZ CREEK, MI (ANS) — If you had a child playing at the edge of an ever-widening sinkhole — and sinkholes lately have been inRick Marschall the news, including ones that swallowed people as well as houses — you would call that child to move back. If your friend were eating something poisonous without realizing the dangers, you would advise that friend of the fact. We do the same, some of us, with people, even strangers, who smoke. “Intervention” today increasingly is employed on behalf of people with drinking problems.

Followers of Christ, who subscribe to the beliefs that all of us make mistakes and are sinful at heart; that therefore a wide gulf separates us from a Holy God; that this God nevertheless desires eternal fellowship with us and offers forgiveness and salvation; and that “accepting” Jesus — believing in our hearts and confessing with our words — these Christians cannot do anything else than have the same regard for other people’s souls as we do their health and comfort.

How often do contemporary Christians fit that last puzzle-piece in place?

Failing this, we condemn ourselves; and we are implicit in sending others to the cold darkness of eternity, separation from God. How often do we avoid sharing even the smallest portion of Jesus with someone because we might “offend them”? Hurt their feelings? “Hey buddy, don’t smoke in your apartment, but I don’t care if you go to hell.”

It’s not always comfortable, but neither was that splintery cross. Living in a multimedia culture makes it easy to assume everyone thinks like we do, or has access to the same facts that we process. Not so. When the Apostle Paul arrived in Ephesus, word-of-mouth about the Savior had already led to the establishment of several Christian communities. But not every word had been shared by every mouth:

“…he reached Ephesus, on the coast, where he found several believers. ‘Did you receive the Holy Spirit when you believed?’ he asked them. ‘No,’ they replied, ‘we haven’t even heard that there is a Holy Spirit.’ ‘Then what baptism did you experience?’ he asked. And they replied, ‘The baptism of John.’ Paul said, ‘John’s baptism called for repentance from sin. But John himself told the people to believe in the one who would come later, meaning Jesus.’ As soon as they heard this, they were baptized in the name of the Lord Jesus. Then when Paul laid his hands on them, the Holy Spirit came on them, and they spoke in other tongues and prophesied” (Acts 19:1-6, NLT).

Paul wrote letters to local churches and church leaders, sharing the good news, and answering questions. These letters comprise the majority of the New Testament. We shared last week how papyrus letters from a generation or two after Paul are extant. Before Christ’s time, spiritual news and God’s words were shared by Torah scrolls, inscriptions, sacred texts. After him we have the successive march of letters, manuscripts, tapestries and stained-glass picture stories, parchment books, printed books, mass-production, tracts, evangelistic crusades, recordings, radio, short-wave, television, and the internet.

The SHARING of the good news is central to the good news itself. “Go into all the world…” Jesus said, commissioning His disciples. Romans 10:14-15 argues: “How can they call on Him to save them unless they believe in Him? And how can they believe in Him if they have never heard about Him? And how can they hear about Him unless someone tells them? And how will anyone go and tell them without being sent? That is why the Scriptures say, ‘How beautiful are the feet of messengers who bring good news!’ (NLT) Like much of the Book of Romans, this is like an advocate summarizing his case. How can they hear about Jesus unless someone tells them?

Right about in the middle of humankind’s list of ways to share the good news — not in a timeline, but in the numbers of methods and technologies — is the radio. After its invention it was available to almost every community on the earth. And much of its message, especially today on short-wave broadcasts, is Christian. I went to Sunday school as a child, but it was preachers on my AM transistor radio from whom I really heard the first hard (and sweet) truths of the Gospel; and came face-to-face with decisions to make, or avoid, regarding Jesus Christ.

Albert E. Brumley was an American gospel songwriter of the past century. He wrote more than 800 sermons-in-song, many of which are favorites today in churches, hymnbooks, and recordings. Among them are “I’ll Fly Away,” “If We Never Meet Again (This Side of Heaven),” “I’ll Meet You In The Morning,” “Jesus, Hold My Hand,” “I’d Rather Be An Old Time Christian,” and “Rank Strangers to Me.”

He told a story about another of his classics… and the role of radio in spreading the gospel:

“I wrote ‘Turn Your Radio On’ in 1937, and it was published in 1938. At this time radio was relatively new to the rural people, especially gospel music programs. I had become alert to the necessity of creating song titles, themes, and plots, and frequently people would call me and say, ‘Turn your radio on, Albert, they’re singing one of your songs on such-and-such a station.’ It finally dawned on me to use… ‘Turn your radio on’ as a theme for a religious… song.”

Like the poor, radio we will always have with us. In the words of the song, “turn your radio on and listen to the music in the air; Turn your radio on and heaven’s glory share…”

Are you tuned in… to what God is saying to you? Don’t touch that dial! You can broadcast (as it were) a brief public-service announcement, or a personal message, every once in a while yourself.

Marschall: We CAN go home again

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By Rick Marschall
Special to ASSIST News Service

SWARTZ CREEK, MI (ANS)Many popular sayings that are regarded as embodying folk wisdom are, in fact, as crumbly as the fortuneRick Marschall cookies where they should stay. I have always been struck by how almost every handy, traditional capsule of folk wisdom is cancelled by another such time-honored saying. “Look before you leap”? But… “He who hesitates is lost.”

You can “roll with the punches” OR “if you can’t stand the heat, get out of the kitchen.” And so forth.

I recently thought the oft-quoted Thomas Wolfe aphorism, “You can’t go home again” when I did in fact visit the home in New York City where I was born, and the address in the New Jersey suburbs where I was reared. I drove from the Philadelphia Christian Writer’s Conference with my friend Shawn Kuhn, who was born in a different neighborhood of Queens. We were each a little surprised that our neighborhoods were clean, appeared safe, and had not fallen prey to real or clichéd urban blight: just the opposite.

Later in the week, with my sister Barbara, we visited the address of our adolescent years — I call it such because it was recently razed and replaced with what regretful “natives” like me are calling “McMansions,” ridiculous mini-estates on half acres. Most of the new owners likely suffer from the affliction common to parvenus, the Edifice Complex.

It was sad to see my home no longer there; our Village School boarded up; the town’s Swim Club closed and overgrown; an d the church of our youth condemned, doors chained closed, neglected.

However. Paging Thomas Wolfe: “You CAN go home again.” I understand that I am supposed to understand that the past is past, a rose is a rose, and all those other syllogisms. The more important facts relate not to whether our parents have died, or our homes have been demolished, but what value they had in our development. The important corners of our memories. Then, the question is not whether we can “go home,” but whether those “homes,” our foundational values, can, or should, ever leave us.

I will call someone else, George Santayana, into the discussion, and mangle his own famous aphorism: “Those who forget the past are not only in danger of repeating it, but of having no past at all.”

I recently quoted Theodore Roosevelt in this space: “Both life and death are parts of the same great adventure.” And we should be reminded that Wolfe’s adage refers to the emotions and our intellectual growth, as much as nostalgic real-estate tours. My childhood is not a house; it was spent in a home that stood there. What I am, or have achieved, as a man is no less real because my parents died after my formative years. The chapel of my affectionate memories is gone, all the more bitter because it stands as a skeleton; but my faith was not diminished because the doors are chained shut.

Indeed, the pasts we miss and the futures we distrust are seldom pieces of real estate or schoolrooms or, say, battlefields. They are of the mind, the intellect, of life-choices, emotions… in fact, the spiritual realm.

Even when we know this fact, whether we are filled with joy or anxiety, it is easy to forget: a most human part of our humanity. My heart currently grieves for the director of the writer’s conference Shawn and I attended, because she is beset by personal problems, health trials facing herself and family members, business challenges galore… (Please look for the website of Write His Answer Ministries and see the wonderful things Marlene Bagnull has done and is doing)

Christians know the Author all good things, and know who the enemy of our souls is, and who comes to seek, and kill, and destroy. Words are cheap (if I can cite another old cliché) but, being a frequent victim of discouragement myself, I feel qualified to remind anyone who will listen that there is a Larger Story. We cannot always see it. But we need to remember it.

“I will not fail thee, nor forsake thee,” Joshua 1: 5.

We call to our memories: we should summon the best of them. They call to us. And, whether our children live near or far, we should always be in the mode of calling them home too. Just as our Heavenly Father does to us.

Rick Marschall is the author of 65 books and hundreds of magazine articles in many fields, from popular culture (Bostonia Magazine called him “perhaps America’s foremost authority on popular culture”) to history and criticism; country music, television history, biography and children’s books. He is a former political cartoonist, editor of Marvel Comics, and writer for Disney comics. Email Rick at RickMarschall@gmail.com.

Colbert: Fulfill the purpose God has in store for you

Published by:

Aimee Colbert

By Aimee Colbert
Special to Inside The Pew

Editor’s note: This is an excerpt from Aimee Colbert’s book, “A Sense of Destiny: From The Prison To The Palace,” which is available on Amazon.com.

Your destiny is your discovery not your decision.

We all have some idea of what we would like to do with our lives but as Christians it is not our place to decide that our opinion mattersAimee Colbert more than God’s.

Our lives are a gift and we are put here in order to give our lives as a gift back to God. So once we understand that God created us for a purpose, it’s our responsibility to fulfill whatever purpose that might be. So when you find out that you have a purpose, it’s time to stop thinking about what you would like to do with your life to make money or to fulfill your desires for accomplishment in some other way. It’s now time to learn how to pursue your real purpose.

Fortunately, our true purpose is actually something that we would already want to do. It’s something that we are already doing hidden in what we do every single day. I feel that once we decide that we want to do something opposite of what God would have us do, we are living in rebellion to God.

Not everyone knows that they have a purpose but if you know that you have a purpose and you decide that you don’t care about what that purpose is or that you’re not interested in doing what God would have you do, I feel you are living in open rebellion to the will of God. What God wants you to do should matter to you if you say that you love Him.

Evangelist and author Aimee Colbert is the author of “The Irreplaceable Woman,” “The Drama Free Life,” “Dear Carlos,” “To Be A Man of God,” “Aimee’s Advice,” I’m Just Sayin’ Vol 1&2,” “You’re Stupid & Shallow So Stay Single Ya Dummy,” “The Irreplaceable Man,” and “I Survived,” which discusses the social issues that affect us all and that bind us together. She practices as a pastoral counselor in Fort Worth. Visit www.aimeecolbert.com.

Haviland: The perception of single fatherhood

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By Matt Haviland
Special to Inside The Pew

“No weapon formed against you shall prosper, and every tongue which rises against you in judgment you shall condemn. This is theMattDaughterFeature heritage of the servants of the Lord, and their righteousness is from Me, says the Lord.” –Isaiah 54:17 (NKJV)

Be honest: when you hear the words “single dad,” what sort of image immediately pops into your mind? Do terms such as “deadbeat” top the list? Or, do you think of a man with solo custody of his children? Do you see them as equal to a single mom? Interesting topic, one I’m sure that many people do not think of regularly- but why not? Are there not plenty of men out there raising their sons and daughters, either by themselves or in a co-parenting situation? To help shed some light on the subject, let’s quickly cover four “point of views” that all add up to one very important question: Are we viewing single fathers the way we should be?

The World’s Point of View

Look, I am well aware of the devastating effect fatherlessness has had on this world. However, to place all single dads in the same category would be equivalent to stereotyping any racial or social class in a likewise manner. It just doesn’t work. Single parenting in any aspect is extremely difficult and those who don’t experience it think they know more than we do. Do not be deceived, however, God’s wisdom is infinitely superior (1 Cor 2:14, 3:18-19) and the Bible tells us that we really shouldn’t be shocked if others don’t care for us (John 15:18, 1 John 3:13).

Our Children’s Point of View

Any sort of single parenting arrangement must be confusing in some way to a child- because it is not God’s natural design and our  human nature knows it. Regardless of how we got here, as fathers, we are still called by God to raise our kids in Christ and to prepare them for adulthood (Psalm 145:4, Prov 20:7). Our kids need us to be there as their protectors and life leaders. A strong, authentic, and Christ-centered lifestyle will only be effective on them if we are truly walking that way and have found what it means to “be still”- even when all hell is breaking loose around us.

Our Point of View

Isn’t it amazing how quickly we can forget who we truly are sometimes? God’s Word tells us that we are hand-stitched and perfectly created for His good works (Gen 1:26, Psalm 139:13-14, Eph 2:10). News flash: God doesn’t make mistakes! When we begin to view ourselves through spiritual eyes rather than our natural, we position ourselves to get a glimpse of the only point of view that truly matters.

God’s Point of View

If we truly believe that Jesus is with us always and we can do all things through Him- then our victory has already been secured. Others may choose to put labels on us or be quick to judge without all of the facts, but as one single dad so perfectly put it, “Just because she left me doesn’t mean He will too.” Brokenness may hurt when it’s fresh, but it is only when a wound is left unattended that it can become infected. God does not see us as the world sees us; He doesn’t even see us as we see ourselves sometimes. Hold fast to His Word tonight, knowing that in Him, all of those promises are “Yes” and “Amen.”

So, going back to my original question: Are we viewing single fathers the way we should be?

Matt Haviland is the founder of “A Father’s Walk” single dad ministry and the author of the book, “A Father’s Walk: A Christian-Based Resources for Single Fathers.” He currently lives in his hometown of Grand Rapids, Mich., is the co-founder of the Grand Rapids Single Parenting Expo, and is a single dad to a beautiful little girl himself.  For more information on the ministry and how to form a single dad small group in your own church, please visit www.afatherswalk.org.

*Editor’s note: This article was originally posted on Crosswalk.com on Aug. 22, 2013. Republished with permission.

 

Lee: Frame your world by the inspired Word of heavenly Father

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By Donald Lee
Special to Inside The Pew

As children of the Most High God, we’ve been empowered by Him, our heavenly Father, to function in this earth in the supernatural, in ways that

Donald Lee

Donald Lee

supersede natural or earthly abilities and that surpass human comprehension.

While this statement may interfere with the theology of many people, the few who actually get this — and who search the scriptures and study the Word diligently — will find themselves discovering a whole other world coming alive to them.

They’ll begin to perceive things that they couldn’t perceive or sense before; they’ll begin to see themselves as who God, our Father, created them to be — supernatural beings clad in natural (or earthly) bodies. Their way of thinking becomes transfigured — revolutionized. And there’s an uncanny boldness (see Ephesians 3:12; Acts 4:13) that comes upon them.

It is with this new-found level of understanding of our relationship with our God — our Daddy — that revelation knowledge takes up residence within our inward man. And with this information, we learn how to flow in this earth as our Daddy commands.

Hebrews 11:3 says: Through faith we understand that the worlds were framed by the Word of God, so that things which are seen were not made of things which do appear. (In your private study time, read slowly and meditate on each verse in the 11th chapter of Hebrews. Each shares how God moved on the behalf of those who put their faith into practice.)

Now, let’s get back to this third verse in Hebrews 11. What’s key here is that we see in scripture that “the worlds” were “framed” by the Word of God. Everything we see and can’t see, everything both in this visible world and the invisible world, the things we can understand and the things we cannot: Everything was created by God’s Word.

In the natural (realm), if we want to build a house, we’ve got get lumber from somewhere, right? We’ve got to pay a contractor — things like that. This is an example of us framing our world by our words with things that do appear. In order for us to build a house, the lumber we need is already here; it’s tangible; we can see it; it exists. So does the contractor.

But all of these things were created by God from nothing. He spoke them and they appeared. The Holy Spirit reminds us that God created us to be just like Him (Genesis 1:26). He loves us. He has adopted us as His children through the works of Jesus.  Since we have crowned Him as Lord and Savior of our lives, we now operate in His splendor.

Turn to John 1:1-14. Read the first 14 verses (King James Version), but start off by emphasizing the first three: In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. The same was in the beginning with God. All things were made by Him; and without Him was not anything made that was made.

The same three verses in the Amplified Bible say: In the beginning [before all time] was the Word (Christ), and the Word was with God, and the Word was God Himself. He was present originally with God. All things were made and came into existence through Him; and without Him was not even one thing made that has come into being.

Jesus is the Word. Jesus was the Word of God made flesh. In other Words, the Word of God dwelt among the people here in the earth, in the person of Jesus Christ, the Messiah, the sent One of God. We see the will of God through the example of His Word, Jesus the Christ. We’ve accepted Christ as our Lord and Savior. Our mandate now, the charge that the Christ, the Word of God, has given us is to allow Him, the Word of God, to be expressed through us.

We are made up of flesh and blood, right? When Christ was here, He came in the “flesh.” He had a fleshly body, an earthly, mortal body. Yet people were able to read the Word of God and know the will of God through the example that He laid out before us with His walk. Thus, He was the Word of God, the will of God, made flesh. We now must be the Word of God made flesh, just as Christ was the Word who dwelt in the earth in the flesh.

Don’t cringe. The Spirit is saying that the Word of God abides in us. Therefore, we must be living examples here in the earth for others to see. The thing is not for them to see us and try to live like us, but to see Christ in us and begin to live their lives in and for Him.

Donald Lee is founder-pastor of Kingdom Living Christian Center in Dallas. To hear his sermons live, call (218) 862-4590 (conference code: 279498#) at 10 a.m. (CST) Sundays and 7 p.m. Thursdays. KLCC has plans for a “Cowboy Church” ministry. Plans for this ministry, coming soon, call for it to be held once a month at a location to be announced.

Tanielle: Separated by denomination

Published by:

Niya Tenielle

By Niya Tanielle
Special to Inside The Pew

My former co-worker had been married for seven years. Being raised Hindu, she married her Christian husband at 18, and surprisingly there wasNiya Tenielle no talk of the difference in religion with her deep rooted Hindu family. Seven years later, her family is no longer practicing Hinduism, but are Jehovah’s Witnesses. Wow, what a difference. And here I was in a relationship with another Christian that was proving difficult to maintain.

Why was the relationship not working? Denomination. Spiritual conversations that were supposed to uplift, enlighten, and create a sense of fellowship, turned into World War III with screaming, telephone hang-ups, and irrational break-ups that would last hours, and sometimes days. I’ve never had so many fights about the interpretation of Bible scriptures in my life. I found myself saying things like, “You sound stupid!..”, and asking, “Does that scripture make any sense to you?”, and my favorite, “Your reading that scripture all wrong!” Needless to say that soon we had lost the lovin’ feeling. A Hindu and Christian have a seemingly “happy” marriage, and two Christians can’t get it together?

He was raised as a Seventh Day Adventist, who even though he called himself a “liberal Adventist”, our teachings were completely different. I am classified as, what some call, a New Testament Christian, believing in speaking confessions and using my mouth to shape my future (Isaiah 55:11), speaking in tongues (Acts 2:4), and resting in the promises of God (Matthew 11:28-29, Colossians 2:16-17), not an old covenant practice of a physical Sabbath day in the Ten Commandments. For him, Exodus 20 is one of the foundations of his faith, and he had no understanding of what confessions were, among other things.

This difference destroyed any plans we had of building a future. Through all the fighting, I held out some shred of hope that we could compromise, learn from each other, and find a happy medium. He was everything I told God I wanted, and some of the great things I forgot to add. We, unknowingly, represented the church as a whole, and played out how the church has been fighting itself for centuries. Pastor against pastor, small storefronts against the mega churches, and I have yet to find a place in the Bible where a demon is fighting against another demon. Hell is on one accord, ladies and gentleman, while God is waiting on us to lead with the same agape love he has shown us.

Agape is selfless, sacrificial, unconditional love, the highest of the four types of love in the Bible. Christian love, distinct from erotic love or emotional affection.

We didn’t shine our light before each other; we simply argued point after point. Stop trying to convince people to see God the way you see Him. It’s a waste of time. God will finish His work, not you (Philippians 1:6). You are a believer, NOT a debater of the Hebrew version of this, and the Greek translation of that. I don’t know anyone who truly cares. People care about your heart, your motives, and a Jesus that’s available to deliver them out of their mess.

I see now we had different aspects to offer each other, and we were in a position to be the best teachers. Maybe if we learned this lesson early, our budding romance could have been salvaged. Lesson learned. What aspects of religion have caused you to lose out on the growth of a relationship, either with God or people? I’d like to hear from you!

Niya Tanielle is editor in chief of The Journey Suite, a Christian-based news site for women. Visit www.thejourneysuite.com.

Earl: The five keys to success

Published by:

La Vonne Earl

By La Vonne Earl
Special to Inside The Pew

At the root of success lies five essential keys – truth, purpose, plan, action, and reward. This model works in every facet of our lives. Stay inLa Vonne Earl prayer as you keep in step with God’s course of action for you.

1. God said you shall know the truth and the truth will set you free (John 8:32). He wasn’t just talking about spirituality. Truth is critical for success in every area of our life. We must know the truth about ourselves to begin with. Who are we? We must understand the truth in each and every given situation in order to distinguish what we are to change in order to attain our goal.

2. Purpose is the crucial element that drives us in life. Without purpose we are lost in a world just consuming oxygen and waiting for it all to end. Our energy becomes depleted as the zest for “what could have been” has slowly faded away. If you are finding yourself disheartened, disappointed, and drained from the hours in the day, then it is quite possible that you are not living out your purpose in life.

3. Once the light bulb has gone on and your energy and excitement has returned the next step is creating a plan. God tells us He knows the plans He has for us. Jeremiah 29:11. You see He has laid it all out in detail. When we are walking in His plans for us with clarity and detail the joy and energy returns!

4. Without action, truth, purpose and planning are nothing more than wasted information. The good news is that once you have established what truth is, found your purpose and devised the plan action is easy! With all the new-found energy and excitement that you will gain starting your day will be a joy!

5. The rewards from the first four keys will begin to pour into your life. This is the point where the keys then must be repeated. As you reap your harvest your question becomes, What is the truth of why I have been blessed? What now is my purpose for this harvest? Who will I help? What plan of Action will I take to bless others? And the circle begins as your keys to happiness, joy and success have been given to you.

La Vonne Earl, a resident of Newport Beach, Calif., is author of Loved into the Light, Shining God’s Light on Mormonism.  Learn more about her ministry at http://www.yourkingdominheritance.com/.

Ellis: Becoming a nation of jugglers

Published by:

By Bill Ellis
Special to ASSIST News Service

SCOTT DEPOT, W.V. (ANS) — To juggle means to keep thingsBill Ellis “continuously in the air.” I tried it with green apples, tennis balls and once with three croquet balls. I was doing well until two of those wooden balls collided and went separate ways enough to allow the third ball to hit me between the eyes. After that headache, I lost my desire to be a juggler.

We all may have been warned, “Don’t try to do too many things at the same time.” We are advised to keep our minds on what we are doing.

There was a time in which parents and grandparents lived a very scheduled kind of life. The father was expected to earn money for the upkeep of his family. Mothers had the primary role of taking care of the family.

We may remember singing, “Monday is wash day, Tuesday is ironing day”David Cain juggler and on it went for every day of the week. Little girls were taught about cooking, cleaning and sewing. Little boys had their chores and learning experiences. Our first teachers were before we started to school.

America’s beloved poet, Robert Frost, had it right when he wrote, “It takes a heap of living to make a house a home.” My friend, Charles Swindoll, brilliant speaker and author of many books, was on target with these wisdom words, “You know what’s helped us in the Swindoll home? To think of where we live as a training place, not a showplace.”

We find many things to do at work, in the community, the home, school or at church. We become like, Martha, the sister of Lazarus, and of whom Jesus said, “Martha, Martha, you are worried and troubled about many things” (Luke 10:41).

It seems like men and women have been in the juggling business since the creation. We always have too many things going at the same time.

Financially we juggle bills. At work, we try to put in more hours than there are in the day. In some communities, there are more volunteers than people able to work.

Mothers and fathers can be busy doing things at the school where their children attend. The pastor is always looking for volunteers to serve in the church. Hospitals get much of their work done by volunteers.

I was the speaker for a Tri-State fund raising rally for the Boy Scouts of America. Two of my all-time favorite Boy Scout executives were Don Berg and Bud Trigleth in Decatur, Ill. Contractors and thousands of volunteers are busy at work to prepare the gigantic new national Boy Scout Camp, not far from where I live in West Virginia.

A piece of paper just dropped from my desk. On the front staring back at me were these big bold words, “WE’RE COUNTING ON YOU!”

We are all in the juggling business to get everything done for ourselves, our family, our school, our church, our neighborhood. My pastor is Dr. Melissa Pratt, one of the most talented young pastors in the nation. She scheduled David Cain, world champion juggler, for special events for our mothers and children the weekend of Mother’s Day.

I and a few other men sat on the back row for one of the most amazing programs I have ever seen. Cain would thrill those at any youth convention, family camp, high school and college audience, award ceremonies. He deals with faith, evangelism, spiritual warfare, Christian living and to demonstrate it he uses balls, rings, boomerangs, a bullwhip and has them all in continuous motion.

His web is www.christianjuggler.com and his e-mail is davidcainjuggler@hotmail.com. Be a winner in the juggling business. Learn how to juggle successfully.

VeggieTales Prize Package giveaway begins today

Published by:

Inside The Pew

Big Idea Entertainment, creators of the popular VeggieTales ChristianVeggieTalesCover entertainment products for children, have teamed up with us to give one lucky reader of Inside The Pew a Veggie Tales Prize Package. The package features five DVD’s: “The Little House That Stood,” released in March, “The Ultimate Silly Song Countdown,” “Sing Alongs “I Can Be Your Friend,” “A Very Veggie Easter Collection” (two discs) and “The Little Ones Can Do Big Things Too.” Also included is “150 All-Time Favorite Songs,” a 3-disc compilation of Sunday school songs, Veggie Tale favorites, and lullabies. The retail value of the package is $100.

To enter the contest, contestants must become an email or comments follower of Inside The Pew between June 3 and June 21. Entrants who follow us on Pinterest and repins “The Little House That Stood” pin in children’s Christian literature board, are given a double entry into the contest. Therefore, each entrant can enter his or her email address into the contest no more than three times. Current email subscribers of Inside The Pew begin with two entries. If the entrant is already an email subscriber, the entrant is welcome to follow us on Pinterest for an additional single entry. The winner will be chosen on June 24 at 5 p.m. CST. On Friday, June 28, the winner of the contest will be emailed and the winner’s name will be announced on our Twitter page. The winner will have 36 hours to respond to our email from pewnews@aol.com. In the event the winner doesn’t respond in a timely manner, the winner will forfeit the prize and a new winner will be chosen. The prize will be mailed to the winner, and upon entry the winner must provide a mailing address.

The contest is open to residents in the United States. Contest is not open to employees, guest columnists, nor the immediate family members employees of Inside The Pew, Pew Talk Radio, EMM Network or Emmanuel and The Mainline Ministries.

Good luck!