Tag Archives: denver broncos

TBN to host annual pre-Super Bowl special featuring player interviews

Published by:

Special to Inside The Pew

Sunday, Feb. 2, 2014, is the biggest game of year; and, on Jan. 31 at 9 p.m. CST, the Trinity Broadcasting Network will get viewers ready forSuperBowlNYNJ Super Bowl XLVIII with a two-hour faith-and-football special from New York City, featuring on-the-field interviews with members of both the Denver Broncos and the Seattle Seahawks, as well as appearances by NFL and other sports greats, along with impacting stories about how faith in God has made a difference in the lives of athletes.

Hosted each year by former NFL player Mike Barber, TBN’s annual Super Bowl pre-game warm-up has featured impacting interviews with many past and present NFL legends, including Kurt Warner, the late Reggie White, Joe Theismann, Aaron Rodgers, Aeneas Williams, Roman Phifer, Don Beebe, and Adam Vinatieri, to name just a few.

Slated for this year’s TBN pre-game special will be segments featuring both team quarterbacks – the Denver’s Peyton Manning and Seattle’s 2012 NFL Rookie of the Year Russell Wilson – along with Super Bowl Media Day interviews with other game-changers such as Seattle’s Chris Maragos, Clint Gresham, and Russell Okung, and Denver’s Jacob Tamme and Joel Dresson.

“We’re excited about this year’s lineup for TBN’s pre-Super Bowl show,” Barber said. “This program is about more than just football. It’s men talking about how Christ has made a difference in their lives, in their families, and even in how they approach the game. This is going to be a life-changing show for our viewers.”

TBN Vice President Matthew Crouch said TBN’s annual Super Bowl pre-game “Praise the Lord” show is one of the network’s most popular and anticipated specials.

“We’ve been hosting this for the past fifteen years, and the list of past guests and participants reads like an NFL ‘Who’s Who,'” he said. “This year’s Super Bowl is sure to be one of the most exciting in history, and we’re looking forward to connecting with some of the players at TBN’s special pre-game warm-up.”

Tebow: Just win, baby

Published by:

Tim Tebow with Patriots offensive coordinator Josh McDaniels

By Paul Hughes
Special to Inside The Pew

If Tim Tebow never plays another down as an NFL quarterback it won’t be because he can’t. It will be because they say he can’t.Tim Tebow with Patriots offensive coordinator Josh McDaniels

I don’t even say “because they think he can’t,” since thinking — actually assessing the data they have in front of them — hasn’t been much involved here.

And the bottom line of that data, the evidence people so often claim they “need” before they can “know” what to do, is that when Tebow plays, his teams win.

This has been the flat out facts since before high school for the man, who’s now approaching five years out of college.

But because he doesn’t play what and how they think he should play, and they are in charge, they will continue to ignore those facts.

Despite our vaunted “rugged individualism” and supposedly believing in bootstraps and quality, we Americans actually have a long history of living as if might makes right, and that whoever is in nominal, public, and visible charge has that might.

And is therefore right.

So if the New England Patriots — who just plucked the man out of oblivion — play him in a different role it will be seen as vindicating that pre-conceived, pre-judged (i.e. prejudiced), and unproven notion, that he can’t play quarterback.

Some news stories indicated that Tebow would now be open to playing a new position, where he had in previous instances apparently declined this.

Perhaps he was committed to what he wanted, to what he believed was the correct and only way to do something, and perhaps to a fault. But now fullback or tight end seems open again.

And he may get the chance: Last week, we learned police want to talk to a Patriots receiver; he’s entering some legal trouble, which would affect his availability to play football. A second player has had multiple surgeries.

Perhaps that was the team’s idea all along, since they surely would have known such a need was beginning to churn. Training for a new season, they’d seek someone who knows how to play the game.

Tebow was in Nowheresville.

The team was hedging bets.

He’d become available.

A match was made.

So Tom Brady may be throwing to Tebow — in the same division as the New York Jets and the same conference as the Denver Broncos. The Patriots have epic rivalries with both these teams.

Recent reports have indicated tight end is not an option. But when the Patriots signed Tebow, someone asked Coach Bill Belichick what position he’d play. His response was, “We’ll see.”

A more likely scenario has Tim Tebow available at the right price — no guaranteed cash and the league minimum for two years if he makes the team — simply to bolster their quarterback ranks.

Meantime the Jets jerked Tebow around all last season. They may be paying for that one — and in more ways than one — for the next couple years.

But undeniably, we live in interesting football times, my friends.

In fact, interesting times are commonly a result when one’s cherished pre-conceptions don’t jibe with truth. As Zig Ziglar used to say, we’re like a cross-eyed discuss thrower: we don’t set many records but we do keep the crowd alert.

We’ll have to endure the crowing by the naysayers, convinced they were right about Tim Tebow — when they had decided beforehand, stacked the deck against him, refused the plain proof, and now may have the opportunity to say, “We told you so.”

But we’ve endured worse.

And Tebow has lived in it.

And anyway, it will be fun to see a situation develop where what’s actually happening is what’s been said all along: that Tebow can play, and should play, and will win if he does. Because that, exactly, is what has happened when a team actually, you know, tries it.

In the little ebook I wrote when Tebow was producing the proof while playing for the Broncos, one point was that Tebow would pick up somewhere, with somebody, that could, somehow, see this — and know what no one else would even look at: the simple bottom line results that when Tebow was allowed to play by the powers-that-be, he certainly could play professional football, and his teams won.

And this is a team sport, right?

Here it is in the form of a proof:

When Tim Tebow plays, his teams win.
His team is the New England Patriots.
If they let him play, they will win, too.

Even if it’s not what anybody thought it would look like in the end.

 

Paul Hughes is a writer in Southern California. The ebook is Tebow: Throwing Stones.

 

Dan Reeves to receive Tom Landry Award at FCA benefit dinner

Published by:

By Jacob Trimmer
Inside The Pew

Former NFL head coach and NFL player Dan Reeves will receive the Tom Landry Excellence of Character Award during a dinner benefiting Greater Dallas Fellowship of Christian Athletes on April 22.

The dinner and program are slated to begin at 6 p.m. at the Westin Stonebriar Resort, 1549 Legacy Drive, in Frisco.

Dan Reeves

Reeves, who played and coached under Landry’s Cowboys, coached the Denver Broncos for 12 seasons, the New York Giants for three, and the Atlanta Falcons for seven. As head coach of the Broncos, Reeves took the team to six post-season appearances, five divisional titles, three AFC championships, and Super Bowls XXI, XXII, and XXIV. He led the Falcons to Super Bowl XXXIII where Atlanta lost to his former team, the Broncos, 34-19.

“This special evening will include a Q&A panel with Dallas Cowboy tight end, Jason Witten, as well as Cowboys tight ends coach John Garrett,” said Rick Bowles, FCA executive director, Dallas. “Also, Benjamin Utecht, formerly of the Indianapolis Colts, will provide the music. This is a favorite of many athletes and one of Dallas’ best events of the year.”

Former past recipients of the honor include Bobby Bowden, Pat Williams, S. Truett Cathy, Roger Staubach, Kenneth Cooper, James and Shirley Dobson, Howard Hendricks, coach Grant Teaff, the Rev. Billy Graham, and coach Jim Myers.

A silent and live auction with one-of-a-kind items up for bid include a cruise with Michael W. Smith, major trips, sports packages and autographed memorabilia.

To purchase tickets for the event, visit www.fcadallas.org/tlo or call 214-739-8003.

In God’s eyes, underdogs always have their day

Published by:

By Pastor Grelan Muse
Founder, Inside The Pew

BATON ROUGE, La. – Another great weekend of NFL playoff action has come and gone. The San Francisco 49ers shocked my New Orleans Saints on Jan. 14 to advance to the AFC Championship Game against the New York Giants on Jan. 22. And, I cannot go without mentioning the Jan. 8 heroics of one Tim Tebow, who led the Denver Broncos to an overtime victory against the mighty Pittsburgh Steelers.

Many felt the underdog 49ers would collapse to the offensive onslaught the Saints orchestrated during the season. In the end, the underdogs had different plans. Forty-niners coach Jim Harbaugh gave his players the greatest words of inspiration before the game. He told his men the team they were not supposed to be in the playoffs. Essentially, the 49ers were cast off. Excuse after excuse was given by naysayers, including the 49ers early dominance of their division, the NFC West.

Now that the dust has cleared, the underdog 49ers is still in the game. Just like the 49ers had their doubters, there are so many people in our society who have been pushed aside. But, God has not. The Almighty will never doubt our abilities. God’s children are not powerless, for it is He who is with us always. In Romans 8:31, it is declared that He is for us, therefore who can be against us. I am sure we all can relate to the story of an individual who overcame obstacles in life despite a sub par start to life. God’s unwavering love is what allows the underdog to keep going.

It is no mystery as to why God finds favor in the underdog. There are endless examples of how God used those who were not expected to push forward to do so. He took care of the Israelites in their despair, made Abraham the leader of nations, allowed Moses to part the Red Sea, used Joseph to save Israel’s sons from starvation, and chose David to be king.

Paul wrote in 1 Corinthians 1:28-29, “God has chosen what is low and despised in the world, things that are not to reduce to nothing the things that are, so that no person might boast before God.”

Tarry on underdogs! Harsh life circumstances and critics who favor worldly thoughts will never dictate your story. God always has the final say.

Pastor Grelan Muse Sr. is founder of Emanuel and The Mainline Ministries Inc. (www.emmnetwork.org), a Baton Rouge, La., 501 (c) 3 nonprofit organization, and Inside The Pew. Connect with us @PewTalk on Twitter and @Inside The Pew on Facebook.

Copyright © 2012 Inside The Pew. All rights reserved.