Tag Archives: tebow: throwing stones

Tebow: Just win, baby

Published by:

Tim Tebow with Patriots offensive coordinator Josh McDaniels

By Paul Hughes
Special to Inside The Pew

If Tim Tebow never plays another down as an NFL quarterback it won’t be because he can’t. It will be because they say he can’t.Tim Tebow with Patriots offensive coordinator Josh McDaniels

I don’t even say “because they think he can’t,” since thinking — actually assessing the data they have in front of them — hasn’t been much involved here.

And the bottom line of that data, the evidence people so often claim they “need” before they can “know” what to do, is that when Tebow plays, his teams win.

This has been the flat out facts since before high school for the man, who’s now approaching five years out of college.

But because he doesn’t play what and how they think he should play, and they are in charge, they will continue to ignore those facts.

Despite our vaunted “rugged individualism” and supposedly believing in bootstraps and quality, we Americans actually have a long history of living as if might makes right, and that whoever is in nominal, public, and visible charge has that might.

And is therefore right.

So if the New England Patriots — who just plucked the man out of oblivion — play him in a different role it will be seen as vindicating that pre-conceived, pre-judged (i.e. prejudiced), and unproven notion, that he can’t play quarterback.

Some news stories indicated that Tebow would now be open to playing a new position, where he had in previous instances apparently declined this.

Perhaps he was committed to what he wanted, to what he believed was the correct and only way to do something, and perhaps to a fault. But now fullback or tight end seems open again.

And he may get the chance: Last week, we learned police want to talk to a Patriots receiver; he’s entering some legal trouble, which would affect his availability to play football. A second player has had multiple surgeries.

Perhaps that was the team’s idea all along, since they surely would have known such a need was beginning to churn. Training for a new season, they’d seek someone who knows how to play the game.

Tebow was in Nowheresville.

The team was hedging bets.

He’d become available.

A match was made.

So Tom Brady may be throwing to Tebow — in the same division as the New York Jets and the same conference as the Denver Broncos. The Patriots have epic rivalries with both these teams.

Recent reports have indicated tight end is not an option. But when the Patriots signed Tebow, someone asked Coach Bill Belichick what position he’d play. His response was, “We’ll see.”

A more likely scenario has Tim Tebow available at the right price — no guaranteed cash and the league minimum for two years if he makes the team — simply to bolster their quarterback ranks.

Meantime the Jets jerked Tebow around all last season. They may be paying for that one — and in more ways than one — for the next couple years.

But undeniably, we live in interesting football times, my friends.

In fact, interesting times are commonly a result when one’s cherished pre-conceptions don’t jibe with truth. As Zig Ziglar used to say, we’re like a cross-eyed discuss thrower: we don’t set many records but we do keep the crowd alert.

We’ll have to endure the crowing by the naysayers, convinced they were right about Tim Tebow — when they had decided beforehand, stacked the deck against him, refused the plain proof, and now may have the opportunity to say, “We told you so.”

But we’ve endured worse.

And Tebow has lived in it.

And anyway, it will be fun to see a situation develop where what’s actually happening is what’s been said all along: that Tebow can play, and should play, and will win if he does. Because that, exactly, is what has happened when a team actually, you know, tries it.

In the little ebook I wrote when Tebow was producing the proof while playing for the Broncos, one point was that Tebow would pick up somewhere, with somebody, that could, somehow, see this — and know what no one else would even look at: the simple bottom line results that when Tebow was allowed to play by the powers-that-be, he certainly could play professional football, and his teams won.

And this is a team sport, right?

Here it is in the form of a proof:

When Tim Tebow plays, his teams win.
His team is the New England Patriots.
If they let him play, they will win, too.

Even if it’s not what anybody thought it would look like in the end.

 

Paul Hughes is a writer in Southern California. The ebook is Tebow: Throwing Stones.

 

Hughes: Whither Tebow?

Published by:

By Paul Hughes
Special to Inside The Pew

Editor’s note: The views in this column are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Inside The Pew staff.

So the question now is whether the future holds a place for Tim Tebow in the NFL.

Well my goodness they didn’t think he belonged there before Peyton Manning signed with the Broncos … so who cares what

What is next for Tim Tebow?

they say now?

When he was succeeding, they said he shouldn’t be. He just shouldn’t.

Why not?

He shouldn’t be succeeding because my … gosh! … just look at him! He shouldn’t be succeeding because he shouldn’t.

Perhaps you begin to see the problem with that reasoning.

Then they were bugged because he was proving them wrong.

Now what?

Deciding whether — or where — Tebow should play when you aren’t the one deciding is like asking if Google+ will topple Facebook. As if you could know.

Tebow will be fine.

And anyway, we don’t know.

Apropos of recent news — where will Peyton Manning sign? — I remember January, when the Colts fired their head coach, Jim Caldwell. The day before he was gone, as one report noted:

Things were so clouded Monday that Caldwell even met with former Rams coach Steve Spagnuolo about possibly becoming the Colts’ new defensive coordinator, and as late as Tuesday morning, the conventional wisdom was that Caldwell would stay.

Then things changed almost as suddenly as the Colts’ fortunes in 2011.

A day before he was fired, the coach met with someone to interview him for a job on his staff! In less than 24 hours, he was gone.

We just don’t know.

He never got real public support from either head coach John Fox or John Elway. These are the areas where support is routinely expressed … but not here.

They had a chance to build a team around the guy, and now another team will have that chance. The conventional wisdom says they will trade him.

Of course, conventional wisdom has been wrong before, and maybe Manning will train Tebow, instead of punch his ticket out.

If they do trade him, the new team will make it work.

Tebow’s a sinner saved by grace — yes — and knows his faith and football both come from God.

But he’s also an elite. He’s an awesome football player.

We may not like elitism … but we love excellence.

Elites.

Tim Tebow is one of them. He’s an elite. He’s in a place every day and a tougher place every week, and one that none of us, critics included, will ever see. He’s better than 1 percent of 1 percent of the world at this.

 

The oldest ugliest brokenest Major League Baseball journeyman utility infielder hitting .230 … the guy who might see a homerun once every 30 games … unless he’s watching his teammates when they’re up … who will never see the inside of Cooperstown unless he buys a ticket or they ask him to introduce someone who got voted in … is a better baseball player than any of us.

Let that sink in here.

Tebow’s good at football.

And he’s pretty good, period.

The more we know about Tim Tebow, the more we like him.

But even that — whether we like him or not — is of no ultimate concern.

Tebow’s New Testament namesake knew a little about pressure and derision.

And Tebow will get better and better.

This I am almost sure of.

And it will be OK.

This I do know.

He’ll be fine.

I recall C.S. Lewis writing somewhere, “If the Lord lets me keep writing, then blessed be He.  And if He does not — then blessed be He.” This was in the early 1960s, a few years before his death. The Lord, it appears, did not let him keep writing.

Blessed be He.

Paul Hughes is a writer in Southern California. This column is partly excerpted from his book, Tebow: Throwing Stones (Kindle). Follow him on Twitter @poetandpriest.

Not rules … vision

Published by:

By Paul Hughes
Special to Inside The Pew

Editor’s note: The views in this column are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of  the Inside The Pew staff.

Now that’s a vision statement.

Life is not rules, but vision. Applications hereof abound.

Consider children.  The gradual trajectory of a child’s life is away from rules and toward vision. Imagine a graph with two lines: Parental rule is one line starting at the top and trending down.  Child responsibility is a line starting at the bottom and heading up.  Both lines start at the left, and move rightward, along the horizontal axis of age and maturity.

That top line heading down is essentially “rules” and the bottom line arrowing up is essentially “vision.” It’s the vision that a day will come, sooner not later, when these lines will cross and the child will be an adult, pursuing the vision … which of course has vastly, radically changed, and become his own, with major modifications.

The goal of the graph is to get their line zooming to God, and mine dragging the bottom for all eternity … perhaps with little blips when they call for advice.

It’s an imperfect picture, but there it is.  And it starts with rules.

It was the same of course with God’s children, Israel.  A constant battle based on law, with God’s kids blowing it every page and a half, on average.  The law was their tutor, their guide … all the way to Christ.

In the fullness of time as the fathers say, the rules gave way to the vision that had always been.  It didn’t supplant the law, though perhaps it superseded it — the way a child pedaling a bicycle or taking the wheel of the family car supersedes the very present hand, then voice, then simply the presence of the Father saying, Do it like this.

When we stopped being children, we put away childish things.

There is an apologetic application as well.  We should show forth a vision of the Kingdom of God encouraging men and women to give their lives to it.  Not because effective, but because it’s true and right.  We may give them rules, but we really must fight always to remember that the vision of it is the thing.

Whether this means they need to know their sinners before they can be saved, or whether a tract is useful, or if an argument should come Intelligent Design or Fyodor Dostoevsky.  Jesus seemed to know who needed to hear it this way or that way, and even who should not hear it at all!

I am here to say that overarching all this should be vision, not rules:

Repent (turn away and move forward, from a constant need for rules),

Friends (not servants, but sons, heirs, and joint-heirs with Jesus Christ),

For the Kingdom of Heaven (the established, effective reign of God),

Is at hand (is visible and available, here and now, as we follow Him).

Now that’s a vision quest.

Paul Hughes is a writer in Southern California. He edited Think and Live for Apologetics.com, and wrote Tebow: Throwing Stones and Burning and Bleeding, among other books. Interact with him at PoetAndPriest.com, on Facebook, or via Twitter. Thanks very much.

 

Perspective on Tebow

Published by:

Author releases eBook centered on quarterback’s influence

By Tonya Whitaker
Inside The Pew

Can he play?

Should he pray?

What’s his future?

If you think Tebow mania is history because the Broncos will not play in Super Bowl XLVI in Indianapolis, guess again.

"Tebow: Throwing Stones" is now available on Amazon.

NFL Network plastered Tebow’s image in its promotion of the station’s upcoming NFL Draft coverage. Then, on Jan. 27, NBC announced programming that coincides with the 18-plus hours of Super Bowl coverage planned to run on all of its networks. The Broncos quarterback is scheduled to appear on “Late Night With Jimmy Fallon” on Feb. 1.

For Tebow enthusiasts and NFL faithful, a new eBook on Tim Tebow picks up where the hype leaves off.

He’s not going away, and the draft – where the Broncos will either build a team around Tebow or trade him – is right around the corner.

“Tebow: Throwing Stones” takes this moment to take a fresh look at the patron saint of the NFL.

Paul Hughes, author of the eBook, reviews Tebow’s playing and praying, and tries his hand at prognosticating the young quarterback’s future.

Available exclusively as a Kindle eBook, “Tebow: Throwing Stones” is available for sale now. Readers with a Kindle device and Amazon Prime Membership can borrow the book for free.

Hughes said the book is short – less than 50 pages – and can easily be read in the run-up to the big game on Feb. 5.

“It’s ‘conversational and accessible,’ as the kids say, with a tone that balances edge with respect,” Hughes said.

And the book is cleverly priced at $3.16. The book is available for purchase at www.amazon.com/dp/B0070HDZOE.

www.amazon.com/dp/B0070HDZOE