America currently wrestles with racial injustice and inequity, it is deeply troubling to honor and celebrate Margaret Sanger, an avowed racist and eugenicist, who diminished communities of color and the marginalized.
 
In a Christian Newswire press release, the Stanton Public Policy Center said they see this as a first step in defunding Planned Parenthood as it is clear Americans do not want public money going to an organization founded by a racist.
 
Stanton Public Policy Center is a women’s advocacy and educational group that works on issues of human rights and justice that empower and inspire women. It is affiliated with Stanton Healthcare which has life-affirming women’s health clinics in America and internationally.

Brandi Swindell National Portrait Gallery
Brandi Swindell, Founder and CEO of Stanton Public Policy Center, protests the inclusion of a bust of Margaret Sanger at the National Portrait Gallery in Washington D.C.

Planned Parenthood removing Margaret Sanger’s name from their New York clinic fits into Stanton’s national campaign to have Margaret Sanger removed from the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, D.C.
 
This national campaign includes: public protests, educational initiatives, petition drives, networking with African-American organizations and members of Congress.
 
Congressman Russ Fulcher (R-Idaho) recently sent a letter to the Honorable Secretary Lonnie G. Bunch III, who is the head of the Smithsonian Institution. In his letter, Congressman Fulcher asked for the removal of Margaret Sanger’s bust from the National Portrait Gallery.

“Stanton congratulates New York Planned Parenthood for removing Margaret Sanger’s name from their abortion center. As America is currently dealing with racial injustice and inequity, it is deeply troubling to honor and celebrate Margaret Sanger, an avowed racist and eugenicist, who diminished communities of color and the marginalized,” said Brandi Swindell, Stanton founder and CEO.

“However, removing the name of Margaret Sanger from a Planned Parenthood clinic is only a first step. The final goal should be removing public funding from an organization founded by a racist and eugenicist. We also continue to call for the removal of a display honoring Margaret Sanger from the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, D.C.”

The Rev. Patrick Mahoney, Chief Strategy Officer for Stanton Public Policy Center, said, “The national campaign to remove the bust of a racist like Margaret Sanger from the National Portrait Gallery is not an attempt to rewrite or change history. Rather, it is a way to ensure we celebrate individuals whose lives reflect and embody the very best of who we are as a nation and honor the values we cherish.

“As America confronts racial injustice, it is critical our national institutions honor those who have inspired us to be our ‘better selves’ instead of honoring those who malign and diminish entire communities.”

Bright Hope is a 50-year-old ministry helping poor churches in developing countries. Their unique success path for raising the poor out of poverty has put hundreds of thousands of people on the road to self-sustainability. Bright Hope Allies are Christians, private businesses, churches and foundations who believe Christians should be active in helping the poorest people on the planet.

Below are 5 actions churches must do to help the extreme poor dealing with COVID-19:

Bright Hope logo
  1. Pivot your thinking from disease prevention to food security. While COVID-19 is impacting the poor and putting healthcare systems at risk, far more of the poor are being impacted by the shutdowns and lack of income for food purchases.
     
  2. Help in-country (indigenous) churches survive and thrive. Many pastors in slums and remote villages have lost contact with their congregation, and therefore their weekly offerings. For churches in extremely poor places there is no online giving option. Pastors are struggling to support their families and it is difficult for them to visit needy members of their church without any resources to offer.
     
  3. Interview your missionaries or experts on how COVID-19 is impacting the world’s poorest communities. Chances are someone in your church has some expertise or a connection. If not, reach out to Bright Hope. We are happy to help.
     
  4. Encourage connection between your church and indigenous poor churches. It is time to be creative. One of our partner churches in rural Uganda began distributing soap to homes in their village. A simple bar of soap was such a blessing and is an important part of virus prevention. They were able to distribute 1,000 bars of soap!
     
    Here’s just one idea: what if a U.S. Church asked each member to buy a bar of soap, write an encouraging note to put inside, and donate $25 for food relief for each family receiving a bar of soap? How great it would be to see food and clean hands in some of the poorest places. Creatively connecting with the poor is needed more than ever, but we must meet real needs in a timely fashion, while helping build long-term relationships.

    * When seeking greater connection with churches in poor places, ask these three questions:

    * What exactly are you asking for?
     
    * What can we do, together, that will make a long-term difference in the lives of the poor?
     
    * How can we provide help in a way that increases our connection/bond?
     
  5. Distribute Bright Hope’s free booklet, COVID-19 and The Extreme Poor: Why the Poor May Be Hit the Hardest. We need to get the word out about the poor and what is going on in their homes. Let Bright Hope be a resource for you—download the booklet and distribute freely. Co-branding the booklet is available to those interested.

Bright Hope is a Christian ministry helping the poorest churches in the world reach their communities with Hope for Today, Tomorrow and Eternity. Visit Bright Hope online or via email

Peter Wooding
Assist News Service

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. (ANS) – Evangelist for the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association, and the grandson of Billy Graham – Will Graham – will co-host a national observance broadcast with America’s National Day of Prayer Task Force president, Kathy william graham is an evangelist with the billy graham evangelistic associationBranzell on May 7.

The US National Day of Prayer is an annual national observance established in public law in 1952 and observed publicly on the First Thursday in May, according to the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association (BGEA).

A BGEA press release said regardless of the unprecedented challenges that America faces today due to the corona crisis and resulting economic shutdown, it will not be canceled nor postponed – but will look very different from years past.

Each year, people gather across the nation, in over 60,000 local community events to pray together for America. While the number of people gathering may be different this year, prayers will be multiplied and amplified through new and creative approaches, combined with unprecedented access to digital platforms. In homes, neighborhoods, communities, cities, states, nation and the world, observing recommended “social distancing” measures, their NDP coordinators are planning to mobilize millions in unified, public prayer for America.

The BGEA reports that while focusing on using these digital platforms, this year’s ‘virtual’ observances have the potential to become the largest prayer ‘gathering’ in U.S. history – with millions praying together, individually.

In addition to virtual events being held in communities across the nation, The National Day of Prayer National Observance Broadcast will take place on May 7 from 8:00 -10:00 p.m. ET. It will be broadcast, streamed, and posted in many ways including, the Billy Graham website, live on their Facebook page and cross-posted by many of their ministry partners. It will be televised on GodTV, Daystar, NLC, and BrioTV, with more stations to come, and on radio through Moody and Bott Radio Networks.

This year’s theme, “Pray God’s Glory Across the Earth”, is based on Habakkuk 2:14, and reminds us that this promise, “for the earth will be filled with the knowledge of the glory of the Lord as the waters cover the sea.” is for us today.

“Unprecedented times call for unprecedented prayer! This year’s ‘virtual’ National Day of Prayer Observance may have more prayer – and more ‘pray-ers’ than ever before!” Branzell said.

By Grelan A. Muse Sr.
Inside the Pew

President Donald Trump has declared that, “We are saying Merry Christmas again.”

Sadly, some people are afraid to say Merry Christmas. In a move not to offend anyone, believers opt for the generic “Seasons Greetings” or “Happymerry-christmas-manger Holidays.” Those two greetings lack individuality. But, there is no subjectivity when it comes to Merry Christmas. When the greeting is spoken, we know exactly what it means. Do Isaiah 7:14, Luke 1: 30-33, and Matthew 1:18-25 sound familiar?

Tony Perkins, president of the Family Research Council, appeared on FOX News’ “The Story With Martha MacCallum” on Dec. 21 to explain that Trump’s stance on Merry Christmas is a “breath of fresh air.”

“So the president coming to the forefront and saying, ‘Look, we’re going to say Merry Christmas again,’ it is a signal to say, You know what, it’s OK to express yourself on religious issues in our culture,’” Perkins said.

Society may or may not say it isn’t acceptable to say Merry Christmas, but Christians have to stand confident in their beliefs. Say Merry Christmas with joy in your heart!

Americans Overwhelmingly Prefer Merry Christmas to Happy Holidays, According to New Marist Poll

By more than 20 percentage points (59 to 36 percent) a majority of Americans prefer the greeting “Merry Christmas” to “Happy Holidays,” according

*Results do not add up to 100 due to rounding (PRNewsfoto/Knights of Columbus)

to a new Knights of Columbus-Marist poll.

The nearly 6 in 10 (59 percent) who prefer Merry Christmas is slightly higher than last year’s 57 percent.

This survey of 1,074 adults was conducted Nov. 6-Nov. 9, 2017 by The Marist Poll. Adults 18 years of age and older residing in the contiguous United States were contacted on landline or mobile numbers and interviewed in English by telephone using live interviewers. The results were balanced to reflect the 2013 American Community Survey 1-year estimates for age, gender, income, race, and region.  Results are statistically significant within ±3.0 percentage points. The error margin increases for cross-tabulations.

Grelan A. Muse is founder of Inside The Pew and Pew Talk Radio. Contact him at pewnews@aol.com.

© 2017 Inside The Pew

 

By Tonya Whitaker
Inside The Pew

For Dr. Lynda Jones-Mubarak, being a champion of early literacy initiatives and tackling hunger in the community in which one lives is a trueauthor-mubarak-carver-city blueprint for happier, safer, and more vibrant communities.

To place her vision in reality, the retired special education teacher, facilitator, and U.S. Army veteran has formed an alliance with Community Food Bank in Fort Worth.

“This alliance was forged in an effort to end hunger in the North Texas region,” Jones-Mubarak said.

As a longtime supporter of the food bank and other community based organizations, Mubarak saw fit to donate 15 percent of all proceeds from her newly published children’s book, titled Carver Park  to the Community Food Bank.

Mubarak said Carver Park is an area that was designated for African-Americans when segregation prevailed as law and as a dominant force in social life in Waco, Texas.

In the book, Mubarak recounts her times in Carver Park and gives readers a perspective of one child who found the vibrancy of life through the harshness of society’s circumstances during that time. The storyline affirms that choice people in our lives provide us with the knowledge and support needed to learn, survive, and progress during a time of great social unrest and historical change, similar to what many marginalized communities may be facing today.

Community Food Bank’s mission serves to fight hunger by providing food, education, and resources to hungry families in a dignified, personal and timely manner. They operate as a food pantry and as a food bank; without ZIP code restrictions.

The educator said the collaboration between Mubarak and the Community Food Bank is the subtle reminder that one person can make a difference, even in the most modest of ways.

Carver Park is available for purchase at www.melaninorigins.com/books/.

Feature photo: Carver Park by Dr. Lynda Jones-Mubarak. Inset photo: Dr. Jones-Mubarak.

© 2017 Inside The Pew